Board of County Commissioners
200 South Cameron Street
P.O. Box 8181
Hillsborough, North Carolina 27278
(919) 245-2130
Fax: (919) 644-0246


Contact: Buck Tredway
Communications Specialist
(919) 245-2126
Fax: (919) 644-0246
e-mail:
btredway@co.orange.nc.us



News Release

July/August 2001

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January/February 2001 | November/December 2000
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Board of Commissioners to hold public hearing on proposed Nov. 6, 2001 Bond Referendum Monday, August 27

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

August 23, 2001

For more information: County Manager's Office, (919) 245-2300, gwilder@co.orange.nc.us

The Orange County Board of Commissioners has scheduled a public hearing at 7:00 p.m. on Monday, August 27, 2001 in the F. Gordon Battle Courtroom at the New Orange County Courthouse in Hillsborough, NC. The purpose of the public hearing is to give all interested citizens an opportunity to speak regarding the elements and amounts of a proposed bond referendum scheduled for November 6, 2001. All interested citizens are invited to attend. The following are the five (5) proposed bond orders that have been introduced by the Board of Commissioners as part of the proposed bond referendum, along with the maximum dollar amount for each order as approved by the Board and submitted to the North Carolina Local Government Commission. These dollar amounts can be reduced by the Board of Commissioners, but cannot be increased as stipulated by the North Carolina General Statutes and the Local Government Commission.

BOND ORDER AUTHORIZING THE ISSUANCE OF GENERAL OBLIGATION SCHOOL BONDS IN THE MAXIMUM AMOUNT OF $47,000,000

BOND ORDER AUTHORIZING THE ISSUANCE OF GENERAL OBLIGATION BONDS FOR PARKS, RECREATION AND OPEN SPACE IN THE MAXIMUM AMOUNT OF $20,000,000

BOND ORDER AUTHORIZING THE ISSUANCE OF GENERAL OBLIGATION BONDS FOR SENIOR CENTERS IN THE MAXIMUM AMOUNT OF $4,000,000

BOND ORDER AUTHORIZING THE ISSUANCE OF GENERAL OBLIGATION LOW AND MODERATE INCOME HOUSING BONDS IN THE MAXIMUM AMOUNT OF $4,000,000

BOND ORDER AUTHORIZING THE ISSUANCE OF GENERAL OBLIGATION BONDS FOR LAND ACQUISITION IN THE MAXIMUM AMOUNT OF $3,000,000

Upon completion of the public hearing, the Board must take final action to adopt the bond orders and officially call for the referendum as part of the November 6 election. These actions may be completed at either the Board work session scheduled for August 30, or at the Board’s regular meeting scheduled for September 4.

Accommodations for individuals with physical disabilities can be provided if the request is made to the Clerk to the Board at least 48 hours prior to the Public Hearing by calling the appropriate number listed below.

Questions regarding the proposed bond items may be directed to the Orange County Manager’s Office located at 200 South Cameron Street, Hillsborough, NC. Office hours are from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday. You may also call 245-2300 (Hillsborough), 688-7331 (Durham), 967-9251 (Chapel Hill-Carrboro), or 227-2031 (Mebane/Graham). Please ask for extension 2300. You will be directed to a staff member who will answer your questions.

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EDC seeks information for buying guide

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Date: August 16, 2001

For more information: Margaret Cannell, Economic Development Commission, 245-2327, mcannell@co.orange.nc.us

Where can you go to buy lawn and garden equipment and a new leash for Rover? Or how do you locate those hard-to-find items like homemade candies and hot air balloon rides? To make it easier for you to Shop Orange First, the Orange County Economic Development Commission is updating its Buying Guide.

The Orange County Buying Guide is a list, by category, of retail businesses in Orange County. The Guide will be updated to include new businesses opened since December 2000, the date of the last version of the guide, or to change addresses or delete businesses that have moved or closed.

"Through the first 10 months of fiscal year 2000-2001, retail sales are 13 percent higher than last year," said Economic Development Assistant Margaret Cannell. "If people are made aware of the great shopping opportunities available in Orange County, we can increase the revenue staying here dramatically."

There is no charge for being included in the guide, and copies are available from the Economic Development Commission in Hillsborough (919-245-2325) or at town halls, libraries, and government buildings. If your retail outlet was not included in the 2000 Buying Guide or you wish to change your listing, please contact Margaret Cannell at 919-245-2327 or by e-mail at mcannell@co.orange.nc.us.

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Household hazardous waste collection and latex paint exchange is Saturday, August 4 at landfill

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Date: July 24, 2001

For more information: Orange Community Recycling, (919) 968-2788, recycling@co.orange.nc.us

On Saturday August 4, Orange County Solid Waste Management Department will conduct its monthly hazardous household waste collection at the Orange County Landfill located on Eubanks Road in Chapel Hill. The event is from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., and is open to residents of Chatham, Durham, Orange and Wake Counties.

Citizens may bring paints, pesticides, automotive wastes, batteries, chemicals and other hazardous materials from their households to the collection. Wastes should not be mixed together but kept in separate, non-leaking containers with the original label when possible.

July’s event was the busiest yet this year, with 286 participants from Orange and surrounding counties. It was a hot day, but people still took time to check out the reuse shelf, where unopened and still useful materials are set aside for residents to take free of charge. The paint exchange, where free latex paint is offered to the public, also saw a lot of action at the July 7 event.

"We try to recycle as much material as we can," said Rob Taylor, recycling coordinator for the Orange County Solid Waste Management Department. "Latex paint is by far the most collected material at any household hazardous waste collection event, so if we can divert the latex paint that is still in good condition from landfill disposal we definitely want to do that.

"If you have only a small amount of latex paint to dispose of and no other wastes, you don’t need to come to us to dispose of it," Taylor said. "You can safely dry the paint out at home by putting cat litter or sand in the paint can and then dispose of the can in your household trash with the paint can lid off. Just be sure that the material is completely dry, as no liquid wastes are permitted in the landfill."

Taylor had other tips to help avoid the crowd at the Saturday household hazardous waste collection.

"If you change the oil in your car, you can bring the used motor oil and oil filter to any of the six County solid waste convenience centers six days a week. (The centers are closed Wednesdays) You don’t have to wait for the household hazardous waste collection for that. You can also bring old auto batteries there. Bring all the other hazardous wastes to us.

"It’s good to save up materials and bring a full load at one time, or coordinate with friends and neighbors to combine loads, Taylor said. "That would help us reduce traffic, which makes the event run more smoothly for everybody."

No commercial wastes, infectious wastes, explosives or radioactive wastes are accepted. Call (919) 968-2788 for disposal information on these materials. Future hazardous waste collection events at the Orange County Landfill will be the first Saturday of each month through November 2001. Call (919) 287-8051 or (919) 942-8158 for information about collection schedules and locations in Chatham, Durham and Wake Counties. Information on non-toxic alternatives can also be provided at any of these numbers.

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Rabid Fox Attacks Orange County Man

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

July 10, 2001

CONTACT: Ron Holdway, (919) 245-2360, rholdway@co.orange.nc.us

Orange County Animal Control officials have confirmed that a rabid fox attacked a man on two separate occasions.

On the evening of July 8th, a man residing on Bowden Road located in southern Orange County, saw a fox chasing his dog. When he went to intervene the fox attacked him, bit his left leg and subsequently ran off. He contacted Orange County Animal Control and was advised to seek immediate medical attention.

The following morning, July 9th, the man noticed the fox had returned to his yard. When he went outside the fox attacked him again – this time biting his right leg several times. Fortunately, the man’s brother-in-law witnessed this event and was able to shoot and kill the fox as it was attacking.

The man is currently undergoing treatment for rabies exposure. This incidence marks the fourth case of rabies in Orange County for 2001.

A Rabies Fact Sheet is provided for your reference. For more information, contact Ron Holdway, Orange County Health Department, at (919) 245-2360.

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RABIES FACT SHEET

HOW DO PEOPLE AND PETS GET RABIES?

  • The disease is spread mainly through bites but rabies can be passed by scratches from an infected animal or when the saliva from an infected animal comes in contact with open wounds or mucous membranes.

WHAT KINDS OF ANIMALS GET RABIES?

  • All mammals can get rabies. Our current wildlife epidemic is mainly confined to raccoons, foxes, skunks and bats. However, unvaccinated dogs and cats are highly vulnerable to rabies.

HOW CAN I PROTECT MY FAMILY AND PETS FROM RABIES?

  • Vaccinate dogs and cats against rabies.
  • Avoid contact with all wild animals as well as all unfamiliar, injured or stray dogs, puppies, cats and kittens.
  • Secure your trash so that it does not attract animals.
  • Do not feed your pets outside. If you must, pick up food dishes after 20 minutes.
  • Call your veterinarian and animal control officers if your pet is attacked by a wild animal. Your pet must be Revaccinated within 72 hours.
  • Report all animal bites to humans to Orange County Animal Control.
  • Confine your animals to your property. Do not let them run loose, especially at night.

WHAT SHOULD I DO IF I AM BITTEN OR SCRATCHED BY A WILD OR STRAY ANIMAL OR PET?

  • Wash the wound thoroughly with soap and warm water.
  • Confine the biting animal, if possible. Call Orange County Animal Control immediately.
  • Kill the animal only as a last resort – but do not damage its head. (Examination of brain tissue is the only way to confirm if the animal has rabies).
  • If the animal is a pet, get the owner’s name and address. Report this information to Animal Control officers.
  • Call your physician at once.

Orange County Health Department
Animal Control Division
2001


Orange County Latina women produce child safety fotonovela

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

July 6, 2001

CONTACT: Susan Clifford, Child Health Promotion Coordinator, (919) 968-2042, scliffor@co.orange.nc.us

Since October 2000, a group of 15 trained Latina women from Orange County called "Child Health Promoters" have provided Latino families with information about child health and safety.

A unique fotonovela called Seguridad para Niņos en la Cocina: Child Safety in the Kitchen is their most recent effort to promote child safety. This 15-page booklet designed, photographed and written by the Health Promoters teaches its readers about child safety through a photo-story format. Popular in much of Latin America, the fotonovela model provides a personal, entertaining, and in this case, bilingual way for readers of all levels to understand the subject matter. In Seguridad para Niņos en la Cocina, Ruby, a local Child Health Promoter, visits her neighbor Lily to show her how to prevent unintentional injuries in children, such as choking, burns, and poisoning. The Health Promoters have distributed copies of the fotonovelas to families and agencies throughout Orange County.

A Smart Start funded program coordinated by the Orange County Health Department, the Child Health Awareness and Promotion (CHAP) project trains parents, grandparents, child care providers and other community members who have close contact with children ages 0-5 years to promote local services and child health in their communities. In order to earn the title of Child Health Promoter, the women participated in a series of classes in Spanish focused on safety, preventive care, health services, child development and discipline, and were certified by the American Red Cross in Infant/Child CPR and First Aid. All of the participants are volunteers and were recommended by local agency staff as natural community leaders or were recruited from local English as a Second Language classes. They represent a diverse range of ages, experiences and countries of origin.

The Health Promoters have referred many families with young children to needed services and have been raising awareness about child health and safety throughout the Orange County Latino Community. "The Child Health Promoters bring a unique community and cultural perspective which, along with their commitment and creativity, has contributed to the success of the CHAP project," says Susan Clifford, project coordinator, "In the case of the fotonovela, the Health Promoters chose the topic, wrote the Spanish narrative, starred in the photographs, and are distributing copies throughout the county."

"It is critical for health and human services agencies to reach out to the Latino community in a way that builds on the strengths that they bring to our communities," said Rosemary Summers, Orange County Health Department Director. "The Child Health Promoter Program gives community members information and skills that they can share with others in the Latino community to encourage access to services needed for all children and families. The health department is proud to be a partner in this effort."

The CHAP project receives a great deal of community support in this effort. Volunteers from UNC’s APPLES Service Learning Program and Campus Y student organization provide child care, and El Centro Latino in Carrboro donates the space for the classes. In the summer of 2001, another Child Health Promoter training is planned for Latino families in Northern Orange County.

For more information about the CHAP project or the new fotonovelas, please call Susan Clifford, Child Health Promotion Coordinator, Orange County Health Department at 968-2042.

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County adds two new items to recycling program

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Date: July 3, 2001

For more information: Orange Community Recycling, (919) 968-2788, recycling@co.orange.nc.us

Recycling in Orange County just became easier with the addition of two new materials to the recycling program.

Residents may now recycle all plastic bottles and empty steel aerosol spray cans. The new service, which began July 1, is provided to all curbside customers, and at multi-family units, solid waste convenience centers, and 24-hour drop-off sites throughout the County.

"The ‘All Plastic Bottle’ recycling program is designed to make recycling easier for residents," explained Rob Taylor, recycling coordinator for Orange Community Recycling. "No longer will people have to search the bottom of a bottle, looking for the number 1, 2, 5, or 7, to see whether or not it can be recycled. The plastics recycling industry has greatly improved its sorting technology, and we are excited to pass along the benefits to our customers."

Empty bottles that once contained hazardous substances, such as motor oil or pesticides, must be thrown away. Bottles that still contain hazardous materials should be brought to household hazardous waste collection for proper disposal. Household hazardous waste collections are held the first Saturday of each month at the Orange County landfill on Eubanks Road.

For purposes of the recycling program, a bottle is defined as a container with a neck smaller than its base. This includes plastic shampoo and laundry detergent bottles, specialty drink bottles, peanut butter jars, ketchup and mustard bottles, as well as traditional soda, water, and milk jugs. Not included in the recycling program are plastic prescription containers, cups, tubs, or trays. These are created using "injection molding," which changes the chemical bonding of the material. The resulting plastics are much more difficult to recycle than bottles, which are "blow molded." When recycling plastic bottles, remove the caps, empty the contents, and crush the containers.

According to studies by the American Plastics Council, communities with "All Plastic Bottle" recycling programs have increased their plastics recycling rate an average of 13 percent, with some communities reaching an impressive 24 percent increase. In Orange County, the average increase could lead to 70 tons of plastic being diverted from the landfill during the current fiscal year.

Steel aerosol (spray) cans have also been added to the recycling program. These cans must be completely empty before they are recycled. Be sure to remove all the contents according to manufacturers’ instructions, and the plastic cap, before recycling. The nozzle does not have to be removed. Do not attempt to flatten or puncture an aerosol can. If there is still material left in the can, it should be disposed of at the County’s household hazardous waste collection.

If liquid is still left in the can, but the aerosol propellant is gone, there may be a malfunction of the product, and it should be returned to the place of purchase.

Orange County anticipates a 3 percent increase in its steel recycling collections with the addition of aerosol cans. This translates to more than 10 additional tons of steel being recycled in Orange County over the next year.

"Orange Community Recycling is pleased to make these two new additions to its recycling programs," said Muriel Williman, Orange County’s recycling educator. "By including more materials collected for recycling, we hope to increase the County’s overall recycling rate."

Remember: Do your part! Recycle all you can, (and all your bottles, too)!

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County seeks volunteers to serve on Bond Education Committee

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Date: July 2, 2001

For more information: Nancy Paciga, Board of Commissioners Office, (919) 245-2125, npaciga@co.orange.nc.us

The Orange County Board of Commissioners will appoint a Bond Education Committee to help develop and disseminate factual information about capital needs. The Bond Education Committee will be comprised of interested citizens who will communicate to community groups, civic organizations, and voters in general about the needs that have led to the scheduling of a November, 2001 bond referendum for Orange County. The Board of County Commissioners plans to appoint the Committee on August 14, 2001 including a chair and co-chair.

All interested citizens are urged to apply by calling the Clerk to the Board’s office at (919) 245-2130. We’ll answer any questions you may have concerning the Bond Education Committee and send you an application if you wish to volunteer. You may also complete an application online, or download one in AdobeŽ.pdf format, please visit the County's Web Site, http://www.co.orange.nc.us and click on the "Volunteer Boards" icon.

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