Board of County Commissioners
200 South Cameron Street
P.O. Box 8181
Hillsborough, North Carolina 27278
(919) 245-2130
Fax: (919) 644-0246


Contact: Buck Tredway
Communications Specialist
(919) 245-2126
Fax: (919) 644-0246
e-mail:
btredway@co.orange.nc.us


News Releases

July/August 2002

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Rabid Bat Bites Child

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Date: August 30, 2002

Contact information: John Sauls, Animal Control, 245-2081; jsauls@co.orange.nc.us

Orange County Animal Control reported today that the State Public Health Lab confirmed yesterday that a bat sent to them by Animal Control tested positive for rabies. Unlike most other bat rabies cases, this bat was known to have bitten someone. That person is a twelve-year-old boy and his mother took him to the UNC Emergency Department to begin post exposure rabies treatment Thursday.

At about 4:30 p.m. Wednesday afternoon the boy was at home in south central Orange County when he discovered that his dog was playing with a downed bat. In an attempt to separate the two he reached to pick up the bat with his hand, whereupon the bat bit him on the finger. The bat did not immediately let go of the boy’s finger however so the boy flung the bat with more force and the bat landed in a nearby tree.

Animal Control Officer Julian Freeman responded to the call, found the bat in the tree, interviewed the boy and his mother and took a bite report. He then took the bat to the shelter for humane euthanasia, then back to Hillsborough so as to pack it and ship it to the State Public Health Lab that evening. The lab notified Animal Control that the bat was positive at about 12:40 pm Thursday. Animal Control called the boy’s mother and she took him to the Emergency Department after he got out of school.

Animal Control Director John Sauls praised the quick work of the responding Officer and said that “whereas any bats can carry rabies, downed bats are highly suspect for rabies.  Bats do not like to be on the ground or other horizontal surfaces, so when you see one downed you can accurately assume it is sick with rabies, overheated, or otherwise seriously distressed.  People should simply never touch bats and they should not allow bats to touch them. Any such contact or any such suspected contact should be reported to Animal Control or the Health Department immediately.”

The next low cost rabies vaccination clinic will be on Saturday, September 21st, 9 a.m.- 11a.m.at the Animal Shelter. 

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Orange County Sponsors 13th Annual Human Services Forum

August 29, 2002

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT: Gwen Harvey  (919) 245-2300

The Orange County Human Services Advisory Commission (HSAC) will host its 13th Annual HSAC Forum on Tuesday, September 10, 2002, from 8:00am to 3:00pm, at the William & Ida Friday Center, located on Laurel Hill Parkway, in Chapel Hill, NC. 

 

This year’s forum is titled, “Community Solutions to Abuse in Orange County: Join Us in a Discussion of Ways to Address Abuse of Children, Teens, Elders and Partners”.  The issue of abuse crosses many populations and affects all age groups.  With approximately 200 anticipated attendees representing a variety of public and private human services agencies, local officials and interested citizens, this year’s forum should offer an engaging and candid discussion.  Guest speakers include:
 

§         Pamela Hawk Fulk, Family Violence Prevention Center;

§         Hudson Fuller, UNC School of Law;

§         Margaret Hudson, Professor Emeritus, UNC School of Nursing;

§         Joyce Moore, UNC-CH Dept. of Pediatrics; and

§         Darrell Renfroe, Orange County Health Department.

 

“The purpose of the Forum is to highlight a concern in the community and provide human services agencies and individual citizens an opportunity to further refine the problem and offer recommendations for possible solutions,” said Gwen Harvey, Orange County Assistant County Manager.  “The Forum allows us to come together as a broad-based community to share ideas and information in a creative and collaborative environment,” explained Harvey.

 

For more information regarding the HSAC Forum or to register, contact the Orange County Manager’s Office, at (919) 245-2300.

 

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Oral Arguments in County’s Fight for Environmental Impact Statement in CP&L Nuclear Waste Storage Case are September 5

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Date: August 29, 2002

For more information: Paul Thames, (919) 245-2300; pthames@co.orange.nc.us

Orange County Commissioner Margaret Brown travels to Washington, D.C. September 5 to hear the County’s attorneys present   oral arguments before the D.C. Circuit of the United States Court of Appeals, regarding the County’s case against the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Carolina Power & Light Company. 

Orange County has appealed a ruling by the NRC that allows CP&L   to significantly expand nuclear waste storage capacity at its Shearon Harris plant in Wake County, without preparing an environmental impact statement (“EIS”).

The oral argument culminates almost three years of litigation, in which the NRC repeatedly turned down Orange County’s request that it hold a hearing on the environmental risks of the high-density pool storage method proposed by CP&L. These risks are more serious than previously understood. 

While the NRC formerly assumed that no harm would befall the spent fuel if water were drained from the pools, NRC’s own experts now conclude that if water is drained from high-density fuel storage pools like the ones proposed for Harris, the fuel will burn. This could cause a catastrophic release of radioactivity, with consequences even worse than the Chernobyl accident. Nevertheless, the NRC has steadfastly refused to prepare an EIS on the Harris spent fuel pool expansion. 

Meanwhile, CP&L has proceeded to accumulate additional spent fuel assemblies from the Shearon Harris plant and the utility’s Brunswick County and Darlington County, S.C. plants. Unless Orange County’s appeal is successful, the Shearon Harris plant would become the largest repository for spent nuclear fuel east of the Mississippi River.

“We can pretend. We can pretend there is no danger posed by the Shearon Harris nuclear waste repository. That’s the way the federal government apparently works when it comes to protecting public health and safety. But pretending doesn’t make it so,” Orange County Board of Commissioners Chair Barry Jacobs said.

“We live in a world where terrorism, human error and chance make it dangerous to maintain huge pools of high-level radioactive waste in a highly populated area. Knowing that, Orange County has fought for a full examination of the safety issues involved at Shearon Harris.

“Finally, after nearly three years, we welcome a chance to make our case before an impartial body. It’s a shame we had to fight our own government as well as one of North Carolina’s most powerful corporations simply to get that opportunity,” Commissioner Jacobs said.

“All we have been trying to do is get a fair and open hearing on the possible consequences of CP&L’s nuclear waste storage expansion plan at a facility located in such a highly populated area. The potential health and environmental issues are obvious.” Board of Commissioners Vice Chair Steve Halkiotis said. “Hopefully, this hearing will help us make people understand the consequences of a catastrophic accident or possible terrorist attack at what would become one of the largest nuclear waste storage facilities in the United States.”

“The images of September 11 that have been burned into our collective memory clearly illustrate that determined terrorists can cause horrific damage,” Commissioner Brown said, “Nuclear waste stored in a dense configuration in open pools makes an inviting target for a 9/11-style attack. And the results of such an attack would have disastrous consequences for our region.”

“An environmental impact statement would evaluate the risks of high-density pool storage, as well as the costs and benefits of reasonable alternatives, such as dry cask storage,” Commissioner Alice Gordon said. “Dry storage is a proven, readily available alternative, that would eliminate the risk of a pool fire and provide an enhanced level of safety in the storage of spent nuclear fuel.”

 “The County has high hopes that the federal appeals court will agree the NRC acted unreasonably and violated federal environmental protection law when it refused to prepare an EIS for CP&L’s proposed expansion of spent fuel storage capacity,” said Diane Curran, the attorney representing Orange County in the case.

In her arguments, Curran will urge the court to send the case back to the NRC for the comprehensive environmental study that it deserves.

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Orange County to Commemorate Anniversary of September 11, 2001

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Date: August 28, 2002

For more information: Royce Hardin, (919) 245-2050; Royce_Hardin@ncsu.edu

Orange County will commemorate the tragic events of September 11, 2001 with a tree dedication and remembrance ceremony. The event will be held Wednesday, September 11, 12 noon, at the Whitted Human Services Center, 300 W. Tryon St., in Hillsborough.

The event is sponsored by Orange County, the N.C. Cooperative Extension Service – Orange County Center, and the Trees of Strength Program.

The Orange County Master Gardener Program and N.C. Cooperative Extension – Orange County Center, initiated the Trees of Strength program as an educational effort to promote the proper selection of trees, planting and maintaining them in a manner that will ensure their longevity, and as a means for individual recognition of the events of September 11, 2001.

Since the planting of the first tree on the lawn of the Hillsborough Town Hall on September 29, 2001, hundreds of Trees of Strength have been planted throughout North Carolina.  The program has also spread to other states, including South Carolina, Missouri and Tennessee.

Individuals, communities, schools, neighborhood associations, civic groups, garden clubs, religious groups and others can participate in the Trees of Strength program.  More information is available through Cooperative Extension or online at www.treesofstrength.org.

The memorial commemoration is part of the celebration of Orange County’s 250th anniversary. There will be a kick-off ceremony for the 250th celebration Monday, September 9, 12 noon, at the old County courthouse in downtown Hillsborough. 

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Recycling to be Collected on Regular Schedule for Labor Day Holiday, Monday, Sept. 2

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Date: August 27, 2002

For more information: Orange Community Recycling, (919) 968-2788; recycling@co.orange.nc.us

Curbside recycling will be collected as normally scheduled on the Labor Day holiday.  If your recycling day falls on Monday September 2, be sure to have your bin out to the curb by 7:00 a.m., or put it out the night before as usual.

The Orange County landfill on Eubanks Road in Chapel Hill will be closed Monday, September 2, 2002.  Normal business hours will resume on Tuesday, September 3 (7:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.).

Questions? Call Orange County Solid Waste Management at 968-2788 or email recycling@co.orange.nc.us

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Household Hazardous Waste Collection is September 7

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Date: August 27, 2002

For more information: Orange Community Recycling, (919) 968-2788; recycling@co.orange.nc.us

The next Orange County household hazardous waste (HHW) Collection will be on Saturday September 7, 2002 at the Orange County landfill on Eubanks Road in Chapel Hill. The event is now open from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. to residents of Chatham, Durham, Orange and Wake Counties.  The HHW collections in Orange County have also been extended until the end of the year, occuring the first Saturday of each month through December. The expanded hours and dates will help accommodate the high demand for this special collection service, and encourage participation in the County’s Toxics Reduction Improvement Program, or TRIP, to keep harmful substances out of our landfill.  

Citizens may bring paints, pesticides, automotive fluids (such as antifreeze, diesel fuel, gasoline,and brake fluid), batteries, cleaning chemicals, fluorescent lights, fertilizers, solvents, and other hazardous materials from their households to the collection. Wastes should not be mixed together but kept in separate, non-leaking containers with the original label intact whenever possible.  No radioactive, medical, or business wastes are accepted.

If you have only a small amount of latex paint to dispose of and no other wastes, you don’t need to come to the household hazardous waste collection to dispose of it.  You can safely dry the paint out at home.  Just be sure that the material is completely dry, as no liquid wastes are permitted in the landfill.  Once latex paint is thoroughly dried, residents can dispose of the cans, with the lids removed, in their regular trash. Accelerate the drying process by stirring cat litter or sand into the open can of paint.  If the paint has been completely used up and there is only a thin residue of dried paint left in the container (less that a ¼ inch coating in the bottom of the can), it can be recycled at drop-off sites and staffed convenience centers with other steel cans.  Make sure the can is made out of metal and the lid has been removed and discarded.

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County Declares Stage II Water Shortage in OWASA Service Area

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

August 23, 2002

For more information: OWASA, (919) 968-4421

Orange County Board of Commissioners Chair today has issued the following proclamation declaring a Stage II water shortage in the unincorporated areas of the county served by the Orange Water and Sewer Authority.


AUGUST 23, 2002

PUBLIC PROCLAMATION OF A STAGE II WATER SHORTAGE IN THE UNINCORPORATED ORANGE COUNTY AREAS IN ACCORD WITH THE COUNTY’S WATER SHORTAGE ORDINANCE

            WHEREAS, the severe drought has caused University Lake and the Cane Creek Reservoir to decline to a level lower than in any previous August on record; and

            WHEREAS, long-range weather forecasts anticipate that current drought conditions will continue for several more months; and

            WHEREAS, on June 6, 2002, the County of Orange adopted “An Interim Ordinance Providing for the Year-Round Conservation of Water and for Temporary Restrictions During Water Shortages and Emergencies Related to all Orange Water and Sewer Authority Customers Located in the Unincorporated Part of Orange County,” which ordinance is referenced in this Public Proclamation as the “Water Shortage Ordinance”; and

            WHEREAS, on July 12, 2002, the County of Orange issued a “Proclamation of a Stage I Water Shortage Affecting Customers in the Unincorporated Orange County Areas Within the Orange Water and Sewer Authority’s Service Area”; and

            WHEREAS, the Executive Director of Orange Water and Sewer Authority has determined that additional water conservation measures are required and that a Stage II Water Shortage exists.

            NOW, THEREFORE, I, Barry Jacobs, Chairman of the Orange County Board of Commissioners, do hereby:

  1. Proclaim the existence of a Stage II Water Shortage under the Water Shortage Ordinance of the County of Orange.

  2. Call upon all customers and users of OWASA water in the County of Orange to follow the Stage II mandatory water use restrictions, as provided in the County’s ordinance.  These restrictions include the following:

  1. Irrigation of lawns, gardens, trees, or shrubs with OWASA-supplied potable water applied through any system or device other than a hand-held hose or watering can shall be allowed only one day during each week.  Unless otherwise recommended by the OWASA Executive Director, properties with odd-numbered street addresses shall be allowed to irrigate only on Mondays and properties with even-numbered addresses shall be allowed to irrigate only on Thursdays.  A total of no more than one-half inch of water shall be applied during any given week.  The restrictions of this section shall not apply to any persons regularly engaged in the sale of plants, who shall be allowed to irrigate their commercial stock in trade.  All OWASA customers are encouraged to minimize or cease outdoor water use.

  2.  Irrigation of lawns, gardens, trees, or shrubs with OWASA-supplied potable water that is sprayed through the air via any system or device other than a hand-held hose or watering can shall occur only after sunset and before sunrise.

  3.  No OWASA-supplied potable water shall be used on sidewalks, driveways, patios, cars, buildings, or other impervious surfaces of a similar nature.

  4.  No OWASA-supplied potable water shall be served in public restaurants except on request.

  5. No OWASA-supplied potable water shall be introduced into any decorative fountain, pool, or pond; or to fill any swimming pool; or to replenish any filled swimming pool, except to the minimum essential for operation.

Violation of the Water Shortage Ordinance shall be a misdemeanor punishable as provided in North Carolina General Statute 14-4.  Violation of the Water Shortage Ordinance shall subject the offender to a civil penalty of $25 for the first offense, $50 for the second offense within a 30-day period, and $100 for any additional offense within a 30-day period.  If the penalty is not paid within 10 days of a citation, the County may recover the penalty through a civil action in the nature of a debt.  The County may enforce the Water Shortage Ordinance through any appropriate equitable action.  Each day that a violation continues shall constitute a separate offense.  The County may enforce the Water Shortage Ordinance through one or a combination of the above remedies.

Barry Jacobs, Chair of the Board of Commissioners

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County Commissioners’ Association Recognizes Car Donation Program

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Date: August 21, 2002

For more information: Bill Mathews, (919) 245-2004; wmathews@co.orange.nc.us

The Orange County Board of Commissioners has recognized Wheels for Work, the County’s car donation program, for winning the Ralph W. Ketner Productivity Award, sponsored by the North Carolina Association of County Commissioners. The recognition came at last night’s Board meeting.

The North Carolina Association of County Commissioners will recognize the newly implemented Wheels for Work program at its annual conference in Winston-Salem, which begins Friday, August 23.

The association annually recognizes the best county programs that significantly improve productivity, improve service and/or reduced program costs during the past year.  Of 82 statewide applicant submissions, the Orange County Wheels for Work program was among 11 selectees to receive the Ralph W. Ketner award. 

The Wheels for Work program is the vision, inspiration and persistence of the Orange County Commission for Women with the functional support and program development by the Department of Social Services and the Department on Aging/Transportation.  This program is managed by the County transportation coordinator, Bill Mathews and began operation in May 2001. 

An essential, formal partnership was formed with TROSA, Inc. in Durham to receive and process the donated vehicles.  During the first year of operation, 35 vehicles were placed with Orange County families in desperate need of work-related transportation. Car donations or applications for donated vehicles should be directed to Bill Mathews, Orange County Transportation Coordinator at 919-245-2004. 

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Orange County to Refine Work First Plan

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Date: August 21, 2002

For more information: Nancy Coston, (919) 245-2800; ncoston@co.orange.nc.us

Local citizens will have an opportunity to provide input into the local efforts to help families with children become economically self-sufficient.  Work First, North Carolina’s program that was created during welfare reform in 1995, provides cash assistance, employment services and other support to prepare families to provide for their children. Since 1995, there has been a 59 percent reduction in the welfare rolls in Orange County.

Many families receive assistance for a short period of time and 1,220 families have obtained employment since the beginning of the program.  Orange County has been very successful in engaging many different organizations to address the needs of these families. The attached report includes information about these partnerships and the program’s accomplishments.

The Orange County Department of Social Services administers the program based on a local plan.  The local plan is developed every two years with input from local citizens, low-income families, business leaders and service providers.  The Orange County Board of Commissioners has appointed the local planning committee that will develop a plan to be submitted to the state for approval.

All planning meetings are open to the public and there will be a public comment period on the proposed plan.  The first meeting will occur on Friday August 23 at 8:30 a.m. at the Southern Human Services Center, 2501 Homestead Rd., Chapel Hill.

For additional information contact Nancy Coston or Gwen Price at 245-2800.

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Work First Status Report


Unvaccinated Dog Wounded by Rabid Raccoon
Twentieth Rabies Case of the Year 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Date: August 12, 2002

Contact Information: John Sauls, Orange County Animal Control 245-2081; jsauls@co.orange.nc.us

The state public health laboratory confirmed Thursday that a raccoon sent for rabies testing by Orange County Animal Control was positive for rabies. This is the 16th case of raccoon rabies confirmed for Orange County this year. Additionally there has been one rabid fox and three rabid bats confirmed for the county this year.

On Wednesday evening, August 6, 2002, at about 7:30 pm, a couple who live in north central Orange County near the Person County line, was sitting on their front porch when they saw a raccoon cross their front yard. They both went into the house to get a firearm. When they came back outside with the rifle, they heard their small dog yelping. They then saw their dog and the raccoon at the base of a tree, where the dog was chained. As the man approached the animals, the raccoon ran up the tree. He shot it once in the chest. It fell from the tree and died.

The man placed a leash on the dog and led it into a large cage without touching it. Upon visually examining the dog in the cage the woman saw that there was blood on the dog’s right front leg.

The couple called 911. When the Animal Control Officer arrived he learned that the dog’s rabies vaccination had expired in June of 2000 and he had not been revaccinated. He therefore impounded the dog as a safety precaution pending the results of the rabies test on the raccoon. On Thursday at 9:30 am the state lab called animal control to report that the raccoon had tested positive for rabies.

Animal Control Director John Sauls said that this is another heartbreaking case of an unvaccinated dog having contact with a rabid raccoon. North Carolina law states that an unvaccinated dog or cat that is reasonably suspected of having been exposed to the saliva of a proven rabid animal through bites or other contact shall be destroyed or confined to a facility approved by the local health director for six months. In this case the owners have elected not to confine the dog and have agreed that the dog be destroyed.

Mr. Sauls noted that confinement for six months is quite expensive and can be very difficult for many dogs and cats, as well as their owners. Destroying such a family pet is, of course, devastating for most pet owners. He again asked pet owners to prove to themselves that their dogs and cats do have current valid rabies vaccinations. He also said that every pet owner should confirm that their pets and their vaccinations are properly registered with animal control.

There will be a $5 rabies vaccination clinic at the animal shelter in Chapel Hill on Saturday, August 17 from 9 a.m. until 11 a.m. Orange County Animal Control will sponsor a $5 rabies vaccination clinic at the Hillsborough courthouse parking lot and at the Northern Orange Human Services Resource Center (Hwy NC 86 North) on Thursday, August 29, from 6 p.m. until 7 p.m.

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County Declares Stage V Water Shortage Emergency

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

August 6, 2002

For more information: Paul Thames, (919) 245-2300; pthames@co.orange.nc.us

Orange County Board of Commissioners Chair Barry Jacobs today declared a Stage V water shortage emergency in areas of the county served by the Town of Hillsborough and Orange-Alamance water systems.


PUBLIC PROCLAMATION

REGARDING USE OF WATER OBTAINED FROM THE PUBLIC WATER SYSTEM SUPPLIED BY THE ORANGE-ALAMANCE WATER SYSTEM, INC. AND THE TOWN OF HILLSBOROUGH AND FROM ANY RAW WATER SUPPLY WITHIN ORANGE COUNTY USED BY THE ORANGE-ALAMANCE WATER SYSTEM, INC. AND THE TOWN OF HILLSBOROUGH

            Pursuant to the provisions of the ORDINANCE PROVIDING FOR THE CONSERVATION OF WATER DURING A WATER SHORTAGE, RESTRICTING THE USE OF WATER AND WATER WITHDRAWALS, AND ALLOCATING AUGMENTED STREAMFLOW FROM RESERVOIRS, I, Barry Jacobs, Chair of the Board of County Commissioners, have been provided with information that the water level of Lake Orange is 7 feet, 5 inches (89 inches) below full and do hereby issue this PUBLIC PROCLAMATION declaring to all persons that a Stage V water shortage EMERGENCY is now in effect applicable to users of water from the public water systems supplied by the Orange-Alamance Water System, Inc. and the Town of Hillsborough (outside of the Town's municipal limits) and any water users otherwise supplied by the Eno River within Orange County.  The following mandatory water conservation restrictions are now applicable:

            It shall be unlawful to use water for the following purposes:

·        To use water outside of a structure for any use other than an emergency use involving a fire.

 ·        To water or sprinkle any lawn.

·        To water any vegetable garden, ornamental shrubs, trees or flower gardens.    

·        To make any non-essential use of water for commercial or public use.

·        The use of single service plates and utensils is encouraged and recommended.

·        To introduce water into any swimming and/or wading pools whatsoever.

·        To operate water-cooled air conditioners or other equipment that does not recycle cooling water, except when health and safety are adversely affected.

·        To operate water-cooled air conditioners or other equipment that do recycle cooling water except during operating hours of the business.

·        To wash automobiles, trucks, trailers, boats, airplanes, or any other type of mobile equipment, including commercial washing.

·        To wash down outside areas such as streets, driveways, service station aprons, parking lots, office buildings, exteriors of existing or newly constructed homes or apartments, sidewalks, or patios, or to use water for other similar purposes.

·        To serve drinking water in restaurants, cafeterias, or other food establishment, except upon request.

·        To use water from public or private fire hydrants for any purpose other than fire suppression or other public emergency.

·        To use water for dust control or compaction.

·        To intentionally waste water. 

·        The owner or occupant of any land or building which receives water from the Orange-Alamance Water System, Inc. or the Town of Hillsborough and that also utilizes water from a well or supply other than that of Orange-Alamance Water System, Inc. or the Town of Hillsborough shall post and maintain in a prominent place thereon a sign furnished by Orange County giving public notice to the use of the well or other source of supply.

This proclamation, and the mandatory conservation restrictions imposed pursuant to it, shall be in effect until the Ordinance entitled "AN ORDINANCE PROVIDING FOR THE CONSERVATION OF WATER DURING A WATER SHORTAGE, RESTRICTING THE USE OF WATER AND WATER WITHDRAWALS, AND ALLOCATING AUGMENTED STREAMFLOW FROM RESERVOIRS" is amended or repealed or until the Chairman by Public Proclamation, declares that the Stage V Water Shortage EMERGENCY is over.  By order of Barry Jacobs, Chair of the Orange County Board of Commissioners, this the 6th day of August, 2002.

Barry Jacobs, Chair

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Orange County Electronics Recycling Collection Day is Successful

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Date: August 1, 2002

For more information: Orange Community Recycling, (919) 968-2788; recycling@co.orange.nc.us

On July 27, 363 Orange County residents brought used, outdated and obsolete electronics equipment to the second County-sponsored electronics recycling collection day at the Eubanks Road Park and Ride lot.  The majority of the 33,200 pounds of equipment collected consisted of computers, printers, monitors and related devices.  People also recycled cell phones, VCRs, stereo equipment and a variety of other electronic devices.  No televisions were accepted, as there is no market for them yet.

Seventy-three percent of the equipment was sent to Synergy, a specialty metals recycling company in Mayodan, N.C.  About 100 of the 307 monitors collected and about 100 of the CPUs were collected by the International Relief Friendship Foundation (IRFF) for their program that bridges the global digital divide by sending usable computers to Cameroon in West Africa.

Rob Taylor, recycling coordinator for Orange County, said, “We are impressed by the willingness of Orange County's citizens to turn out, even in the intense heat, to recycle their old electronics. It's environmentally important to keep these devices out of landfills. Many contain lead, cadmium and other materials that are harmful to human health and the environment.”

Michael Lamson, President of IRFF, added, “We applaud the citizens of Orange County for generously donating their usable computers to poor people in other parts of the world who could not get a computer any other way.  We are setting up a program in Cameroon to train people in use and repair of computers so they can improve their economic situation. Lives are being changed because of what you do.  If individuals want to donate working computers or other items to IRFF, they should call (919) 782-1954.”

The County plans to establish a permanent collection program this fall at the located at the Orange County Landfill, thus does not plan any more one-day collection events.  Additional announcements will be made once the permanent program is ready.

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Animal Control Confirms 19th Rabies Case for 2002

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Date: August 1, 2002

Contact: John Sauls, Animal Control 245-2075 ; jsauls@co.orange.nc.us

Orange County Animal Control learned Monday that a raccoon sent to the state public health lab for rabies testing was positive for rabies. That raccoon is the 16th to be confirmed rabid this calendar year in Orange County. Also confirmed rabid this year were two bats last week and a fox earlier in May.

In this case a lady was walking her dog in the woods on her property in northeast Orange County on Saturday when her dog attacked a raccoon.

On Sunday she returned to the site and retrieved the dead raccoon and on Monday she brought it to the animal control office in Hillsborough. At that time she reported that she had contact with her dog immediately after it had attacked the raccoon. Her dog had a current valid rabies vaccination and the owner took it for a booster on Monday. She was referred to a communicable disease nurse in the health department.

All raccoons are rabies suspects and any raccoon out in the daytime is most likely sick and very likely to be rabid. Most dogs that are somewhat bigger than raccoons will attack and kill a raccoon they encounter with speed and efficiency, often without being wounded themselves. This is truer when the raccoon in question is sick with rabies and unable to defend itself as well as a healthy raccoon. Under any circumstances however, even when the raccoon does not inflict an injury on the dog, the possibility exists that some of the rabid raccoon’s virus-laden saliva will get on the dog. The danger is that the dog’s owner or some other person will touch or handle the dog in such a way as to transfer that saliva onto their hands. If they have a cut or other open wound on their hand, the saliva and the virus could find its way into that wound.  Another way the virus can get into a person’s body is by that person putting their hand to the inside of their mouth, nose or eyes, thereby transferring the virus to a mucous membrane.

Although the virus cannot penetrate intact skin, it can find entry into the body through an open wound or through mucous membranes. Therefore public health authorities warn that when a dog has had contact with a raccoon, even if that encounter is just a standoff with the two animals hissing (and spitting) at each other, the dog should not be handled but rather should be isolated away from potential human contact for a period of two hours. This allows time for any saliva to dry up and the virus to die. The rabies virus is a volatile virus and exposure to the elements of the environment outside the animal or the saliva will kill it. Animal Control Director John Sauls reminds citizens, “If you must touch your dog after such an encounter, wearing gloves and not raising your hands to your face and washing your hands thoroughly with warm water and lots of soap are the best prescription immediately after you have secured the dog”.

There will be a $5 rabies vaccination clinic at the animal shelter in Chapel Hill on Saturday, August 17, 2002, from 9 until 11 am.

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Next Household Hazardous Waste Collection to be held Saturday August 3

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

July 26, 2002

For more information: Orange Community Recycling, (919) 968-2788; recycling@co.orange.nc.us

The next Orange County household hazardous waste (HHW) collection will be on Saturday August 3, 2002 at the Orange County landfill on Eubanks Road in Chapel Hill. The event is now open from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. to residents of Chatham, Durham, Orange and Wake Counties.  The HHW collections in Orange County have also been extended until the end of the year, occurring the first Saturday of each month through December. The expanded hours and dates will help accommodate the high demand for this special collection service, and encourage participation in the County’s Toxics Reduction Improvement Program, or TRIP, to keep harmful substances out of our landfill.  In July we had over 300 customers.  

Citizens can bring paints, pesticides, automotive fluids (such as antifreeze, diesel fuel, gasoline, and brake fluid), batteries, cleaning chemicals, fluorescent lights, fertilizers, solvents, and other hazardous materials from their households to the collection. Wastes should not be mixed together but kept in separate, non-leaking containers with the original label intact whenever possible.  No radioactive, medical, or business wastes are accepted.

Household (dry-cell) batteries, automotive (wet-cell) batteries, used motor oil and oil filters do not need to be brought to the household hazardous waste collection.  Save time by recycling these items 6 days per week at any Orange County solid waste convenience center instead. They are located throughout the County at Bradshaw Quarry Road, Eubanks Road, Highway 57, Ferguson Road, High Rock Road and Walnut Grove Church Road. They are open Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday from 7 a.m.-12.p.m. and 1.p.m.-7.p.m., Saturdays from 7 a.m.-5 p.m., and Sundays from 1.p.m.- 5 p.m.

The paint exchange, open during the household hazardous waste collection, offers free latex paint in good condition that has been diverted from the HHW collection to the public.  Other unopened, reusable items such as spackle and stains that have been brought to the household hazardous waste collection are also offered for pick-up by residents.  All services provided at the household hazardous waste collection are free to residents.

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Animal Control Confirms Two  Cases of Bat Rabies

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

July 26, 2002

Contact: John Sauls, 245-2081; jsauls@co.orange.nc.us 

Orange County Animal Control reported two bats that had been found in occupied homes were confirmed rabid by the state public health lab earlier this week.

In the first case, two children were playing on the computer in the dining room at about 2:30 a.m. when they saw a bat fly through that room and the openly adjoining living room where their older sister was sleeping on the couch. They awakened their parents who were sleeping in the adjoining master bedroom with the door open. The parents saw the bat fly through an open door into another adjoining room, a study, which also had an open door to the Master bedroom. They quickly closed the door to the study that the bat had flown through but were delayed by about a minute before they could close the door from the study to the master bedroom. They were satisfied nevertheless that the bat was still in the study and placed towels at the bottoms of the two doors to prevent the bat from escaping. The children slept in other rooms with doors closed. They called Animal Control the following morning and the on-call officer arrived and searched the study for the bat for two hours without results. A new strategy to find the bat later in the same day was developed and the officer left. About mid afternoon the husband was alone in the house when he saw the bat flying in the study again and again secured both doors and called 911 for animal control. This time the officer found the bat in the study. The bat was tested Tuesday morning and the positive results along with consultation with the communicable disease nurse were provided to the parents immediately.

In the second case, a woman heard a squeaking noise after her cat entered its cat door about 7:30 p.m. Sunday. She investigated and found that her cat was in possession of a dead bat. The husband bagged the bat without touching it and they put in the freezer. They called their vet the next morning. The vet told them to call Animal Control and reminded them the bat should be preserved in the refrigerator instead of the freezer. Animal Control picked up the bat and it too was tested Tuesday morning. The director’s interview with the woman revealed that there was no exposure to anyone but the cat who received a rabies booster that day.

Animal Control Director John Sauls said that these people did a pretty good job of responding and protecting themselves from exposure under the circumstances. However he reminded the public that bats have to find a way into a house in order to expose sleeping people. In the first case it was uncertain whether the bat came through the front door when the family came home late at night or if the bat came through the walk-in attic door that had been left open earlier that Saturday afternoon. And, as in the second case, everyone who has a cat and a cat door knows that there’s no telling what the cat may bring in. But it can be a real problem if the cat brings in a live bat then releases it still alive.

There will be a $5. rabies vaccination clinic at the Animal Shelter on August 17th from 9 to 11 am, Saturday, August 17.

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Orange County Announces Next Step to Acquire Construction and Demolition Landfill Property

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Date: July 25, 2002

For more information: Rod Visser, (919) 245-2300, rvisser@co.orange.nc.us; Gayle Wilson, (919) 968-2885, gwilson@co.orange.nc.us

Orange County announced today that it is proceeding under plans approved eighteen months ago to acquire land and develop additional disposal capacity for construction and demolition (C&D) waste materials generated in Orange County.  

A resolution approved by the Orange County Commissioners on February 7, 2001 directed the County Manager to pursue acquisition and permitting of a C&D site on four parcels of land, totaling about 18 acres, immediately adjacent to and west of current landfill property on Eubanks Road. The Board’s action at the time endorsed development of a new construction and demolition landfill in Orange County which, as part of a master plan that emphasizes reduction and recycling activities, will assure an environmentally sound and  convenient option for managing the residual materials from local generators of construction and demolition waste.

Negotiations with the owner concerning the purchase of the property have been ongoing since February 2001 and have thus far been unsuccessful.  Accordingly, the County has sent notification to the property owner of the County’s intent to acquire the parcels through the process of eminent domain.  Funds for acquisition of the property and construction of the additional landfill space will come from reserves set aside in the Solid Waste/Landfill Operations Enterprise Fund.  The cost will be borne almost exclusively through fees paid by solid waste facility users, and not from property taxes that support the County’s General Fund. This property has no dwellings located on it, is not part of the historic Rogers Road community, and was heavily timbered in recent years.

Orange County needs additional C&D landfill capacity because the existing C&D landfill is expected to be full around the end of 2002.

In August 2000, the advisory C&D Recycling Task Force noted in its recommendations to the County Commissioners that the County should take responsibility for reuse and disposal of its own C&D wastes.  Since then, the Board has approved a Solid Waste Facilities Master Plan and adopted a Regulated Recyclable Materials Ordinance intended to enhance the County’s ability to divert C&D materials from the landfill for reuse.  Orange County has the best per capita waste reduction record among the State’s 100 counties over the past decade at 37 percent.  The County was also recently recognized by the North Carolina Public Interest Research Group with a grade of “A+” for its overall recycling programs and results.

Barry Jacobs, Chair of the Orange County Board of Commissioners noted:  “The Orange County Commissioners have quite reluctantly taken this step towards acquiring through eminent domain the land needed for C&D recycling and disposal activities. Good faith negotiations over the past 18 months failed to produce agreement.  The Board would be pleased if before formal condemnation proceedings take place, the County and the property owner can reach agreement on a purchase price that is fair to both the owner and the citizens of Orange County.”

The area selected by Orange County has already received a site suitability determination from the North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources, whose Solid Waste Section is responsible for permitting and monitoring the construction and operation of public and private landfills throughout the State.  The Duke University Board of Trustees, which owns adjacent property, recently approved an easement agreement with the County that will provide for appropriate buffers of the C&D management activities from surrounding properties.   The agreement with Duke is in keeping with the County’s aim to provide substantial buffers to minimize the impact on neighbors of any additional solid waste activities.

Once the land has been acquired, permitting and construction of the new C&D landfill is expected to take from 9-12 months.  In keeping with the County’s commitment to openness the County Manager and staff have, and will continue to, coordinate with the landfill neighbors regarding development of the site.

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Violators of Mandatory Water Use Restrictions Face Possible Warnings, Fines

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Date: July 19, 2002

For more information: Paul Thames, (919) 245-2300, pthames@co.orange.nc.us

With most of Orange County under some type of mandatory water use restrictions, officials are reminding residents that they may face warnings and fines under the County ordinance that applies to water shortages.

Customers of the Town of Hillsborough and Orange-Alamance water systems are under Stage IV water use restrictions. Violators of the provisions of these water use restrictions may face warnings and fines of $50 or 30 days in jail per violation.

“This is a problem of growing severity, with no end in sight,” said Board of Commissioners Chair Barry Jacobs. “Conservation now can avert a public health crisis later. Please – don’t be a drip. Save every drop you can.”

For customers of the Town of Hillsborough and Orange-Alamance water systems, it is unlawful:

  • To water or sprinkle any lawn.

  • To water any vegetable garden, ornamental shrubs, trees or flower gardens except between the hours of 6:00 p.m. and 9:00 p.m. on Saturdays.

  • To make any non-essential use of water for commercial or public use.

  • To fill newly constructed swimming and/or wading pools or refill swimming and/or wading pools which have been drained. A minimal amount of water may be added to maintain continued operation of pools, which are in operation at the time the provisions of a stage III WARNING are placed into effect.

  • To operate water-cooled air conditioners or other equipment that does not recycle cooling water, except when health and safety are adversely affected.

  • To wash automobiles, trucks, trailers, boats, airplanes, or any other type of mobile equipment, including commercial washing. 

  • To wash down outside areas such as streets, driveways, service station aprons, parking lots, office buildings, exteriors of existing or newly constructed homes or apartments, sidewalks, or patios, or to use water for other similar purposes.

  • To operate or introduce water into any ornamental fountain, pool or pond or other structure making similar use of water.

  • To serve drinking water in restaurants, cafeterias, or other food establishment, except upon request.

  • To use water from public or private fire hydrants for any purpose other than fire suppression or other public emergency.

  •  To use water for dust control or compaction.

  • To intentionally waste water. The owner or occupant of any land or building which receives water from the Orange-Alamance Water System, Inc. or the Town of Hillsborough and that also utilizes water from a well or supply other than that of Orange-Alamance Water System, Inc. or the Town of Hillsborough shall post and maintain in a prominent place thereon a sign furnished by Orange County giving public notice to the use of the well or other source of supply. For more information on obtaining this public notice, contact
    Paul Thames, County Engineer, (919) 245-2300, pthames@co.orange.nc.us.

     

Also, The use of single service plates and utensils is encouraged.

OWASA customers are now under Stage I water use restrictions. For more information on water use restrictions for OWASA customers, visit their web site at www.owasa.org, or call (919) 968-4421. Citizens may report violations of water use restrictions to OWASA at extension 324.

While not subject to warnings or fines, well owners are not immune to the current water emergency. Last week, the Orange County Health Department issued an advisory to well owners encouraging them to conserve water to avoid seeing their wells run dry.

The Orange County Sheriff’s Office will enforce water use restrictions in the unincorporated areas of the county and issue warnings or citations to violators. Sheriff’s deputies also will assist in enforcement in Hillsborough, Chapel Hill and Carrboro. Citizens who witness violations of the water restrictions are urged to contact the Sheriff’s Office at (919) 245-2900, visit the department’s web site at www.co.orange.nc.us/sheriff/ or email websheriff@co.orange.nc.us.

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Orange County Initiates Stage IV Water Use Restrictions

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Date: July 17, 2002

For more information: Paul Thames, (919) 245-2300, pthames@co.orange.nc.us  

Barry Jacobs, chair of the Orange County Board of Commissioners, today issued the following proclamation declaring a Stage IV water shortage danger alert in areas of the county served by the town of Hillsborough and Orange-Alamance water systems.


PUBLIC PROCLAMATION

REGARDING USE OF WATER OBTAINED FROM THE PUBLIC WATER SYSTEM SUPPLIED BY THE ORANGE-ALAMANCE WATER SYSTEM, INC. AND THE TOWN OF HILLSBOROUGH AND FROM ANY RAW WATER SUPPLY WITHIN ORANGE COUNTY USED BY THE ORANGE-ALAMANCE WATER SYSTEM, INC. AND THE TOWN OF HILLSBOROUGH

            Pursuant to the provisions of the ORDINANCE PROVIDING FOR THE CONSERVATION OF WATER DURING A WATER SHORTAGE, RESTRICTING THE USE OF WATER AND WATER WITHDRAWALS, AND ALLOCATING AUGMENTED STREAMFLOW FROM RESERVOIRS, I, Barry Jacobs, Chair of the Board of County Commissioners, have been provided with information that the water level of Lake Orange is 5 feet, 10 inches (70 inches) below full and do hereby issue this PUBLIC PROCLAMATION declaring to all persons that a Stage IV water shortage DANGER is now in effect applicable to users of water from the public water systems supplied by the Orange-Alamance Water System, Inc. and the Town of Hillsborough (outside of the Town's municipal limits) and any water users otherwise supplied by the Eno River within Orange County.  The following mandatory water conservation restrictions are now applicable:

            It shall be unlawful to use water for the following purposes:

  1. To water or sprinkle any lawn.

  2. To water any vegetable garden, ornamental shrubs, trees or flower gardens except between the hours of 6:00 p.m. and 9:00 p.m. on Saturdays.

  3. To make any non-essential use of water for commercial or public use.

  4. The use of single service plates and utensils is encouraged.

  5. To fill newly constructed swimming and/or wading pools or refill swimming and/or wading pools which have been drained.  A minimal amount of water may be added to maintain continued operation of pools which are in operation at the time the provisions of a stage III WARNING are placed into effect.

  6. To operate water-cooled air conditioners or other equipment that does not recycle cooling water, except when health and safety are adversely affected.

  7. To wash automobiles, trucks, trailers, boats, airplanes, or any other type of mobile equipment, including commercial washing.

  8.  To wash down outside areas such as streets, driveways, service station aprons, parking lots, office buildings, exteriors of existing or newly constructed homes or apartments, sidewalks, or patios, or to use water for other similar purposes.

  9. To operate or introduce water into any ornamental fountain, pool or pond or other structure making similar use of water.

  10. To serve drinking water in restaurants, cafeterias, or other food establishment, except upon request.

  11. To use water from public or private fire hydrants for any purpose other than fire suppression or other public emergency.

  12. To use water for dust control or compaction.

  13. To intentionally waste water.  The owner or occupant of any land or building which receives water from the Orange-Alamance Water System, Inc. or the Town of Hillsborough and that also utilizes water from a well  or supply other than that of Orange-Alamance Water System, Inc. or the Town of Hillsborough shall post and maintain in a prominent place thereon a sign furnished by Orange County giving public notice to the use of the well or other source of supply.

             This proclamation, and the mandatory conservation restrictions imposed pursuant to it, shall be in effect until the Ordinance entitled "AN ORDINANCE PROVIDING FOR THE CONSERVATION OF WATER DURING A WATER SHORTAGE, RESTRICTING THE USE OF WATER AND WATER WITHDRAWALS, AND ALLOCATING AUGMENTED STREAMFLOW FROM RESERVOIRS" is amended or repealed or until the Chairman by Public Proclamation, declares that the Stage IV Water Shortage DANGER is over.  By order of Barry Jacobs, Chair of the Orange County Board of Commissioners, this the 17th day of July, 2002.

Barry Jacobs, Chair

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Orange County Animal Control Confirms 16th Rabies Case and Reports One Happy Ending

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Date: July 15, 2002

For more information: John Sauls, (919) 245-2075, jsauls@co.orange.nc.us

Orange County Animal Control is reporting the sixteenth case of terrestrial rabies.  On July 15, 2002 the health department received confirmation that a raccoon found on Chapel Hill’s Ephesus Nature Trail was positive for rabies.

A Chapel Hill resident was walking her two dogs along Ephesus Nature Trail where she discovered a small raccoon. Armed with rubber gloves and a recycling bin, the woman scooped up the raccoon and took it to the Animal Shelter. Because of possible contact with the dogs, the raccoon was tested for rabies.  The dogs were current on their rabies vaccinations and only required a booster.

Orange County Animal Control Officer, Dale Teer reminds residents that “sick or injured animals should be reported to Animal Control—just call 911.  Rubber gloves are a good idea when handling dead animals, but live animals can bite right through.  Nocturnal animals, like raccoons, out during the day should be a red flag.” 

In a separate incident on July 2, 2002, an Orange County Motor Speedway employee attempted to capture three stray puppies.  During the attempt the man was bitten on the hand.  The puppies got away from the man and he took no further action. On July 15, a speedway worker flagged down an Animal Control Officer who was trapping dogs in the same area. He told her that there were stray dogs coming into the speedway and he wanted her to set a dog trap on speedway property. She did and he told her about the bite that had happened two weeks before. She took a bite report and advised him to see his own doctor to be evaluated for post exposure rabies treatment. He did see his physician and he was contacted by the Orange County Health Dept. Communicable Disease Nurse. Meanwhile, Animal Control trapped and confined five healthy pups believed to comprise the entire litter.

This story had a happy ending because Animal Control was able to capture what is believed to be all of the pups, one of which was the bite dog, and they were all healthy, but the account illustrates the importance of reporting dog and cat bites to Animal Control as soon as they happen so that no time is lost in seeking to protect the victim from rabies.

Animal Control officials have additional warnings for pet owners. If you suspect your pet has had contact with a wild animal, do not touch them.  “Isolate your pet, call 911 and do not touch the pet over the next 2-3 hours to avoid possible contact with infected saliva. This is a good time to use rubber gloves --when securing your pet,” states Officer Teer.

For more information on rabies call Orange County Animal Control at 245-2075.  The Animal Protection Society is sponsoring a rabies vaccination clinic on July 20, 2002 from 9am-12 noon at Weaver Street Market in Carrboro.

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County Initiates Stage I Water Shortage Alert in OWASA Service Area

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Date: July 10, 2002

For more information: Paul Thames, (919) 245-2300, pthames@co.orange.nc.us

Barry Jacobs, chair of the Orange County Board of Commissioners, today issued the following proclamation declaring a Stage I water shortage alert in unincorporated areas of the county served by the Orange Water and Sewer Authority (OWASA). 


PROCLAMATION OF A STAGE I WATER SHORTAGE 
AFFECTING CUSTOMERS IN THE UNINCORPORATED ORANGE COUNTY AREAS WITHIN THE ORANGE WATER AND SEWER AND SEWER AUTHORITY'S SERVICE AREA

 WHEREAS, a prolonged period of low rainfall and streamflow, which began more than a year ago, has resulted in water levels at University Lake and Cane Creek Reservoir that are lower than in any previous June on record; and

WHEREAS, water use in the Orange Water and Sewer Authority's service are reached a one-day record of 16 million gallons on June 13, 2002, due largely to extensive outdoor usage; and

WHEREAS, since the OWASA Board of Directors adopted a Resolution Requesting Voluntary Water Conservation Practices on June 27, 2002, the total volume of water stored in OWASA’s Cane Creek/University Lake/Stone Quarry reservoir system continues to decline and is approaching the 125 day level, as estimated by customer demand patterns of the past 30 days; and

WHEREAS, long range weather forecasts anticipate that current drought conditions will persist for several more months; and

WHEREAS, the OWASA Board of Directors adopted a Resolution Proclaiming a Stage I Water Shortage on July 11, 2002;

WHEREAS, the Orange County Board of Commissioners on June 4, 2002 adopted AN INTERIM ORDINANCE PROVIDING FOR THE YEAR-ROUND CONSERVATION OF WATER AND FOR TEMPORARY RESTRICTIONS DURING WATER SHORTAGES AND EMERGENCIES RELATED TO ALL ORANGE WATER AND SEWER AUTHORITY CUSTOMERS LOCATED IN THE UNINCORPORATED PART OF ORANGE COUNTY, which ordinance is referenced in this proclamation as the "Water Shortage Ordinance";

NOW, THEREFORE, I, Barry Jacobs, Chair of the Board of Commissioners of Orange County, do hereby:

1. Proclaim the existence of a Stage I Water Shortage, under the Water Shortage Ordinance of the County of Orange,

2. Call upon all customers and users of OWASA water in the unincorporated Orange County areas within the Orange Water and Sewer Authority's service area to follow the Stage I water use restrictions, as provided in the County's ordinance.  These restrictions include the following:

  1. Irrigation of lawns, gardens, trees, or shrubs with OWASA-supplied potable water applied through any system or device other than a hand-held hose or watering can shall be allowed only three days out of each week.  Properties with odd-numbered street addresses shall be allowed to irrigate only on Mondays, Wednesdays, and/or Fridays; properties with even-numbered addresses shall be allowed to irrigate only on Tuesdays, Thursday, and/or Saturdays.  A total of no more than one inch of water (as measured in a shallow container, such as an empty tuna fish can) should be applied during any given week.  The restrictions of this section shall not apply to any persons regularly engaged in the sale of plants, who shall be allowed to irrigate their commercial stock in trade
  2. Irrigation of lawns, gardens, trees, or shrubs with OWASA-supplied potable water that is sprayed through the air via any system or device other than a hand-held hose or watering can shall occur only after dusk or during pre-dawn hours.
  3. No OWASA-supplied potable water shall be used on sidewalks, driveways, patios, cars, buildings, or other impervious surfaces of a similar nature.
  4. No OWASA-supplied potable water shall be served in public restaurants except on request.

Business and Institutional customers, including the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC), shall be encouraged to:

  1. Cease the use of OWASA-supplied potable water for outdoor purposes, except as provided in items A and B above.  UNC shall develop a three-day irrigation schedule for campus facilities in consultation with OWASA.

  2. Curtail the use of OWASA-supplied potable water for the cleaning of facilities such as window air conditioning units, chilled water coils, closed loop heating systems, and government-owned vehicles.

  3. Reduce the heating/cooling load demand from lower priority facilities to the extent allowable with regard to indoor air quality standards and employee health and safety requirements.

Violation of the Water Shortage Ordinance shall be a misdemeanor punishable as provided in N.C. General Statute 14-4. Violation of the Water Shortage Ordinance shall subject the offender to a civil penalty of $25 for the first offense, $50 for the second offense within a 30-day period and $100 for any additional offense within a 30-day period. If the penalty is not paid within 10 days of a citation, the County may recover the penalty through a civil action in the nature of a debt. The County may enforce the Water Shortage Ordinance through any appropriate equitable action. Each day that a violation continues shall be constitute a separate offense. The County may enforce the Water Shortage Ordinance through one or a combination of the above remedies.

This the 12th day of July, 2002

Barry Jacobs, Chair of the Board of Commissioners

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Health Department Issues Water Conservation Advisory for Well Owners

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Date: July 10, 2002

For more information: Ron Holdway, (919) 245-2360 

Well owners in Orange County are being advised to begin water conservation steps immediately.  The drought can have delayed effects on wells and the impact of no rain may be felt as late as this Fall.  Environmental health officials are asking well owners to fix leaky plumbing especially faucets and commodes.  Refrain from watering lawns and car washing, and take shorter showers.

Air or gurgling from the faucet, slower flow, or no water are signs the well may be going dry.  Call Orange County Environmental Health Services, 919-245-2360for water conservation tips and well water information.

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Computer and Electronics Recycling Collection to be Held July 27

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Date: July 9, 2002

For more information: Orange Community Recycling, (919) 968-2788, recycling@co.orange.nc.us

Orange County residents can recycle their old computers and certain other electronics items for free at a special collection event to be held Saturday, July 27, from 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. at the Eubanks Road park and ride lot in Chapel Hill.

Accepted items include computer monitors, computers (CPU’s), keyboards, mice, scanners, printers, external drives, speakers and computer cables.  We will also be accepting photocopiers (toner cartridges removed), cell phones (batteries removed), fax machines, telephones, telephone systems, radios, stereo receivers, compact disc players, cassette players, VCR’s, and laser disc players.  No televisions will be accepted at this time, nor can we accept any of these items from businesses at the July 27 collection event. 

The computer and electronics recycling collection event is for Orange County residents only. If residents miss this collection, the department of Solid Waste Management anticipates having a permanent collection facility open at the Orange County landfill in the fall of 2002.  Businesses should contact Orange Community Recycling at (919) 968-2788 or email recycling@co.orange.nc.us for assistance on how to properly manage their electronic wastes. 

Citizens bringing computers to the collection event should take care to remove any sensitive or confidential data from their hard drives.  Programs for cleaning your hard drive are readily available on the Internet.

This electronics recycling event is part of a larger effort by Solid Waste Management to reduce the amount of toxic material going into the Orange County landfill.  A computer monitor can contain up to eight pounds of lead, and other potentially toxic or harmful materials are found in many electronic devices.  Diverting these items from landfill disposal reduces the chance that harmful materials will contaminate the environment.  Materials collected at this event will either be refurbished and reused, or recycled.

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Orange County Animal Control Confirms 14th Rabies Case

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Date: July 5, 2002

For more information: John Sauls, (919) 245-2075, jsauls@co.orange.nc.us

Orange County Animal Control officials today confirmed the County’s 14th rabies case of the year.

On July 2, a Morgan Creek Road resident witnessed her two dogs in the area of Morgan Creek. The dogs did not come when they were called, so the resident went to the creek to investigate.

The resident saw a raccoon when the dogs finally approached their owner. One of the dogs brushed up against the resident as she was returning them to their pen, and two children may have had contact with the dogs after they were put back into the pen.

The three residents were referred to their family physician for treatment. The dogs had current rabies vaccinations and received booster vaccinations on July 3.

The body of the raccoon was sent to the state public health lab for rabies testing, and Orange County Animal Control was advised of the positive test result today.

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No Change in Recycling Service for Independence Day, Thursday July 4, 2002

Landfill Closed July 4

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Date: July 3, 2002

For more information: Orange Community Recycling, (919) 968-2788; recycling@co.orange.nc.us

Curbside recycling will be collected on a regular schedule on the July 4 holiday.  If your recycling day falls on Thursday, July 4, be sure to have your bin out to the curb by 7:00 a.m., or put it out the night before as usual. 

The Orange County Landfill on Eubanks Road in Chapel Hill will be closed Thursday, July 4, 2002.  Normal business hours will resume on Friday July 5 (7:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.).

Questions? Call Orange County Solid Waste Management at (919) 968-2788 or email recycling@co.orange.nc.us

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New Extended Hours Next Household Hazardous Waste Collection, Saturday July 6

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Date: July 3, 2002

For more information: Orange Community Recycling, (919) 968-2788; recycling@co.orange.nc.us

The next Orange County household hazardous waste (HHW) collection will be on Saturday July 6, 2002, at the Orange County landfill on Eubanks Road in Chapel Hill. The event is now open from 8 a.m.- 4 p.m. to residents of Chatham, Durham, Orange and Wake Counties.  The HHW collections in Orange County have also been extended through the end of the year, occurring the first Saturday of each month through December. The expanded hours and dates will help accommodate the high demand for the special collection service, and encourage participation in the County’s Toxics Reduction Improvement Program (TRIP) to keep harmful substances out of our landfill.  

Citizens can bring paints, pesticides, automotive fluids (such as antifreeze, diesel fuel, gasoline, and brake fluid), batteries, cleaning chemicals, fluorescent lights, fertilizers, and other hazardous materials from their households to the collection. Wastes should not be mixed together but kept in separate, non-leaking containers with the original label intact whenever possible.  No radioactive, medical, or business wastes are accepted.

Household (dry-cell) batteries, automotive (wet-cell) batteries, used motor oil and oil filters do not need to be brought to the household hazardous waste collection.  Save time in line by recycling these items at any Orange County solid waste convenience center instead. They are located throughout the County at Bradshaw Quarry Road, Eubanks Road, Highway 57, Ferguson Road, High Rock Road and Walnut Grove Church Road. They are open Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday from 7 a.m.-12 p.m. and 1 p.m.-7 p.m., Saturdays from 7 a.m.-5.p.m., and Sundays from 1 p.m.-5 p.m. 

The Paint Exchange, open during the household hazardous waste collection, offers free latex paint to the public.  Paint in good condition that has been diverted from the HHW collection and other unopened, reusable items can all be picked up for free at the Paint Exchange.  Stop by and check out our selection.

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