Board of County Commissioners
200 South Cameron Street
P.O. Box 8181
Hillsborough, North Carolina 27278
(919) 245-2130
Fax: (919) 644-0246


Contact: Buck Tredway
Communications Specialist
(919) 245-2126
Fax: (919) 644-0246
e-mail:
btredway@co.orange.nc.us


News Releases

September/October 2002

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July/August 2002 
May/June 2002 | March/April 2002
January/February 2002 | November/December 2001
September/October, 2001 | July/August, 2001
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March/April 2000 | January/February 2000 | December 1999


Health of Orange County Breakfast

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

October 24, 2002

For more information: Donna King, (919) 245-2449

Healthy Carolinians of Orange County and the Orange County Health Department will host a breakfast on November 14, 2002 from 7:30-9:00 AM at the United Church of Chapel Hill located at 1321 Airport Rd.  The purpose of the breakfast is to present the 2002 Health of Orange County Report to the community.  The report will show Orange County’s progress and status on major health issues and present the latest initiatives of Healthy Carolinians partners to address health issues in Orange County.  The event is open to the public and the cost is $5. Please RSVP to Maria Hitt by November 11 at 968-2022 Ext 291.

Healthy Carolinians works with the community to track data and develop grass roots programs to respond to the issues that the community believes are important.  At this event a short assessment of the Health of Orange County will be presented to the public.  In addition, participants will learn how they can be involved in a countywide needs assessment that the Health Department and Healthy Carolinians will be conducting in 2003.  This will be a full-scale assessment that will include analysis of current data as well as numerous interviews and focus groups with residents of the county to determine what residents see as the current most important health priority issues.  As a result of the 2003 assessment, Healthy Carolinians may establish new areas of focus for our community-based health and prevention programs.

On November 14th there will also be displays from the 6 micro-grant projects that were funded this year by Healthy Carolinians.  The Micro-grants helped to establish new prevention programs that address Healthy Carolinians 2010 goals within community agencies.  The program will also share information on the many health initiatives that are now underway in the community focusing on child abuse prevention, health promotion and teen pregnancy prevention.

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Household Hazardous Waste Collection to be held November 2

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

October 24, 2002  

For more information: Orange Community Solid Waste Management, (919) 968-2788; recycling@co.orange.nc.us

The next Orange County Household Hazardous Waste (HHW) Collection will be on Saturday November 2, 2002 at the Orange County Landfill on Eubanks Road in Chapel Hill. The event is now open from 8am-4pm to residents of Chatham, Durham, Orange and Wake Counties.  The HHW collections in Orange County have also been extended to include the month of December this year.

Citizens can bring paints, pesticides, automotive fluids (such as antifreeze, diesel fuel, gasoline,and brake fluid), batteries, cleaning chemicals, fluorescent lights, fertilizers, solvents, and other hazardous materials from their households to the collection. Wastes should not be mixed together but kept in separate, non-leaking containers with the original label intact whenever possible.  No radioactive, medical, or business wastes are accepted.

Residents don’t have to wait for a special collection to recycle motor oil, oil filters, household batteries, or automotive batteries.  They can be brought to staffed solid waste convenience centers instead. The six centers are located throughout the County at Bradshaw Quarry Road, Eubanks Road, Highway 57, Ferguson Road, High Rock Road and Walnut Grove Church Road. They are all open the following hours: Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday, 7am to 12pm and 1pm to 7pm. Saturday 7am to 5pm. Sunday 1pm to 5pm. They are closed on Wednesdays.

If you have only a small amount of latex paint to dispose of and no other wastes, you don’t need to come to the Household Hazardous Waste collection to dispose of it.  You can safely dry the paint out at home.  Just be sure that the material is completely dry, as no liquid wastes are permitted in the landfill.  Once latex paint is thoroughly dried, residents can dispose of the cans, with the lids removed, in their regular trash. Accelerate the drying process by stirring kitty litter or sand into the open can of paint.  If the paint has been completely used up and there is only a thin residue of dried paint left in the container(less that a ¼ inch coating in the bottom of the can), it can be recycled at drop-off sites and staffed convenience centers with other steel cans.  Make sure the can is made out of metal and the lid has been removed and discarded.

If you need paint for projects, free latex paint in good condition that has been diverted from the HHW collection is available at “The Paint Exchange”, open during the Household Hazardous Waste Collection.  Other unopened, reusable items such as spackle and stains that have been brought to the Household Hazardous Waste Collection are also offered for pick-up by residents.  All services provided at the Household Hazardous Waste Collection are free to residents.

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Get your Flu Shot - Not the Flu

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

October 24, 2002

For more information: Donna King, (919) 245-2449

Changing leaves, falling temperatures, and harvest festivals are just a few of the signs that the Fall season is near.  It is also the season for Flu prevention campaigns and time to prepare for a healthier winter.  “Get your flu shot—not the flu,” says Public Health nurse, Pam McCall.

Influenza is a seasonal threat that on average claims the lives of 20,000 Americans each year.  Influenza, commonly called “the flu”, is an infection of the respiratory tract caused by the influenza virus.  Symptoms include fever, muscle ache, sore throat and dry cough.  Complications from the flu can include pneumonia and bronchitis, especially in older adults.

Influenza vaccine is the best prevention against the flu and will help reduce the risk of illness and death.  In the United States, flu vaccine is made from killed influenza viruses, which cannot give you influenza infection.  There can be side effects from any medication, the most common being soreness at the injection site.  Careful screening prior to receiving the injection is conducted to reduce possible allergic reactions and other complications.  Different strains of the influenza viruses are in circulation in the course of a year.  Production of the vaccine is based on the viruses most likely to cause the greatest problems in the up coming flu season.  Therefore, it is necessary to get flu shot each year.

The Orange County Health Department recommends the flu shot for:

¨       Everyone 50 years of age and older.

¨       Residents of long-term care facilities.

¨       Anyone who has long-term health problems.

¨       Anyone with a weakened immune system.

¨       Anyone 6 months to 18 years of age on long-term aspirin treatment.

¨       Pregnant women who will be past the 3rd month of pregnancy during the flu season (Nov.-March).

¨       Physicians, nurses, family members, or anyone else coming in close contact with people at risk of serious influenza.

Public Health officials also encourage flu shots for healthy children 6-23 months of age, healthy adults, people who provide essential community services, people living in dormitories or under other crowded conditions—anyone who wants to reduce their chance of catching influenza.

Special Flu Clinics are being held by the health department to meet demand. 

Please call and make an appointment.

Southern Human Services Center,

2501 Homestead Road, Chapel Hill, NC 27516

968-2022

  October 31 from 8:30a.m-4:00p.m.

  November 1 from 1:00p.m-4: 00p.m.

  November 7 from 8:30a.m.- 4:00p.m.

  November 8 from 1:00p.m.-4:00p.m.

  November 14 from 8:30a.m.-4:00p.m.

  November 15 from 8:30a.m.-4:00p.m.

  November 22 from 8:30a.m.-4:00p.m.

_______________________________________

Walk-in  Clinics* Kerr Drug at University Mall

  October 29 from 10:00a.m.-2:00p.m.

 November 4 from 10:00a.m.-2:00p.m.

 November 12 from 10:00 a.m.-2:00p.m.

 

Richard E. Whitted Human Services Center

300 West Tryon Street, Hillsborough, NC 27278

245-2400

 

October 28  from 8:30a.m-4:00 p.m.

November 4  from 8:30a.m-4:00 p.m.

November 11 from 8:30a.m-4:00 p.m.

 

_____________________________________

Walk-in Clinics* Hillsborough Community Policing Center at Fairview

November 5  from 11:00 a.m. –2:00p.m.

November 6  from  4:00p.m.-7p.m.

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County Volunteers, The American Way

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

October 23, 2002

For more information:  
Nancy C. Glover, Assistant to the Clerk, (919) 245-2125

Orange County agencies believe their volunteers exemplify the American Way as shown by volunteers selected for their commitment and impact on the community.

Twenty individuals and four groups will be recognized at a local reception on October 30th  from 5 – 7 p.m. at the Chapel Hill Senior Center as “Orange County Key Volunteers.” In addition, five of the Key Volunteers will receive the N.C. Award for Outstanding Volunteer Service (formerly known as the “Governor’s Awards”)at a regional reception. Sponsors of the local event include the Orange County Commissioners, RSVP (Retired and Senior Volunteer Program), and Volunteer Orange.

Barry Jacobs, Chair of the Orange County Board of Commissioners says, “Tennessee is known as the Volunteer State. Perhaps in honor of the passion and dedication of the hundreds of volunteers who enrich our community and help fuel our government, Orange should be called the Volunteer County.”

2002 N.C. Award For Outstanding Volunteer Service Award (formerly known as the “Governor’s Award”) Winners From Orange County

Charles Paddock

Charles has over 16 years of volunteer service to his credit.  He has served this community at a number of agencies.  His work with the many programs at the Orange County Department on Aging has been extremely important for many people.  Overall, Charles is an extraordinary volunteer.  He is patient, efficient, knowledgeable, kind and has a wonderful way with all types of people who come from a wide variety of backgrounds.  He is quietly unhurried. When he is with you, you have his undivided attention and he gives you the consideration you deserve. He truly energizes people with his enthusiasm so that they “catch” it, too. He makes people feel a true part of a team effort and that what they do is extremely important, no matter what it is.

Violeta Simon

Violeta began volunteering 18 years ago with Interfaith Council and has also worked with several programs including Shared Learning. Her current volunteer work at the front desk with El Centro Latino has shown outstanding creativity, consistency, and dedication.  She is dedicated to her work and very reliable.  Violeta is constantly working in the community to improve the quality of life of people she serves. She has made a particular impact on the Latino community through El Centro Latino because of her resourcefulness, patience and genuine desire to help.

Jean Waterbury

Jean has been volunteering with Ronald McDonald House since it's opening in 1986.  She is truly the workhorse of the RMH volunteers. She is a whirlwind of energy and spunk and is always willing to put in extra hours and energy to take care of the needs of the RMH. Her service as a volunteer-trainer is especially appreciated.  Overall she has shown tremendous dedication, hard work, and sacrifice as a volunteer during the past 16 years.

Blue Ribbon Mentor Advocates

This group has shown tremendous dedication and has far exceeded the role of “Volunteers.” They consistently go above and beyond the role of a typical mentor. They are the Chapel Hill-Carrboro City School District’s most active group of volunteers who are committed to closing the minority achievement gap.  Each one has become like a family member to their mentees.  They have provided friendship, advocacy, and an important role model for many youths who may not have otherwise had these valuable influences.  Each Blue Ribbon Mentor has also contributed mightily to the academic success and future life successes of each individual child that they have taken time to mentor.   The Blue Ribbon Mentor Advocates have made tremendous differences in the lives of many children.

People's Court Mediators

The People’s Court Mediators have shown great dedication in helping people help themselves in dealing with problems.  With over 16 years each of experience in court mediation, they are highly efficient in helping to resolve disputes and reduce the court's caseload.  The Dispute Settlement Center's Mediation program has become a model for other court districts in the state. They are the most involved volunteers that our judicial district has.  Each mentor builds an intense personal relationship with his or her mentee and family. This job can require a mentor’s attention at any time and they give of themselves emotionally all the time. Their most special quality is the way in which they give so much of themselves without asking for anything in return.

2002 Orange County Key Volunteer - Individuals

Natalie Ammarell  
Grace Beattie  

Tracy Carroll  

Jamie Charlson  

Ron Colby  

Bill Graff  
Scott Madry  
Peter Monk  

Charles Paddock  

Susan Pearce  
Victoria Schmidt  

Violeta Simon  

James Sinnott  
Lloyd Stein  
Ann Wagoner  

Jean Waterbury  

Frances Widmann  
Lisa Woods

2002 Orange County Key Volunteer - Groups

ARC of Orange County – Community Connections Program
Blue Ribbon Mentor Advocates of Chapel Hill-Carrboro Schools
People's Court Mediators – Orange County Dispute Settlement Center
Community-Based Vocational Training of Chapel Hill-Carrboro YMCA


 "On the Road" Bike Rodeo

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

October 17, 2002

For more information: Donna King, (919) 245-2449

Hillsborough— An average of 13 children under the age of 19 die each year as a result of bicycle crashes in North Carolina and an additional 120 children are seriously injured.   Head injuries pose the greatest risk to bicyclist.

The Hillsborough Police Department, Orange County Schools, Helping Hands of Whitted, Orange County Safe Communities and SAFE KIDS Orange County are teaming up to provide a bicycle safety course to children of the Fairview and Whitted Forest communities. 

On Saturday, October 19, 2002, from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m., the Hillsborough Community Policing Center will be the host site for the “On the Road” bike rodeo and safety course.  Children interested in participating will need to bring their bike and bike helmet.  Parents are being asked to accompany their children and participate in the educational sessions.  Parents will need to register and sign a permission slip for each participant.

Sergeant Irving Davis, Hillsborough Police, has designed three age appropriate bike rodeo courses to help cyclist improve their skills and practice real life situations.  Free bike helmets will be provided to those in need.

Children aged 12 and up will be taken ‘on the road’ for a four mile residential skills ride.  They will have the opportunity to practice entering intersections, traveling with traffic, obeying traffic signs, using appropriate hand signals, and learning when to ride and when to walk their bike. 

 Food, fun, and games will be a part of the day’s festivities.  Participants will be entered into a drawing to win State Fair tickets.  “We hope children will have fun as they learn to be more safe as they ride.  We know we can eliminate 85% of all head injuries if we can keep bike riders wearing their helmets”, states Louise Echols, SAFE KIDS Orange County.

 For more information on participating in the bike rodeo and safety course, call Sergeant Irving Davis, Hillsborough Police Department, at 732-2441.

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 Changes to Regular Meeting Calendar

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

October 16, 2002

For more information: Donna Baker, (919) 245-2130

The Orange County Board of Commissioners has made changes to their regular meeting calendar for the year 2002.

 The Board of Commissioners has changed the meeting time for their scheduled Work Session on Monday, October 21, 2002 to 5:30 p.m. at the Government Services Center, 200 South Cameron Street, Hillsborough, North Carolina.

 The Board of Commissioners has scheduled a Work Session for Monday, October 28, 2002 beginning at 7:00 p.m. at the Southern Human Services Center, 2501 Homestead Drive, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, in order to discuss animal shelter issues.

 The Board of Commissioners has moved their scheduled Board Retreat from Saturday, December 7, 2002 to Saturday, January 25, 2002, beginning at 9:00 a.m. at the Southern Human Services Center, 2501 Homestead Drive, Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

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 Water Restrictions Rescinded

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

October 14, 2002

For more information: Paul Thames, Orange County Engineer
(919) 245-2303

PUBLIC PROCLAMATION

REGARDING USE OF WATER OBTAINED FROM THE PUBLIC WATER SYSTEM SUPPLIED BY THE ORANGE-ALAMANCE WATER SYSTEM, INC. AND THE TOWN OF HILLSBOROUGH AND FROM ANY RAW WATER SUPPLY WITHIN ORANGE COUNTY USED BY THE ORANGE-ALAMANCE WATER SYSTEM, INC. AND THE TOWN OF HILLSBOROUGH

           Pursuant to the provisions of the ORDINANCE PROVIDING FOR THE CONSERVATION OF WATER DURING A WATER SHORTAGE, RESTRICTING THE USE OF WATER AND WATER WITHDRAWALS, AND ALLOCATING AUGMENTED STREAM FLOW FROM RESERVOIRS,

               I, Barry Jacobs, Chair of the Board of County Commissioners, having been provided with information that the water level of Lake Orange has risen point that it is less than 24 inches below full do hereby issue this PUBLIC PROCLAMATION declaring to all persons that the all Water Shortage Stages (V-Emergency, IV-Danger, III-Warning and II-Alert) and all of the associated mandatory or voluntary water use restrictions applicable to users of water from the public water system supplied by the Orange-Alamance Water System, Inc. and the Town of Hillsborough are now rescinded.

            This proclamation, and lifting of all water conservation restrictions pursuant to it, shall be in effect until the Ordinance entitled  "AN ORDINANCE PROVIDING FOR THE CONSERVATION OF WATER DURING A WATER SHORTAGE, RESTRICTING THE USE OF WATER AND WATER WITHDRAWALS, AND ALLOCATING AUGMENTED STREAMFLOW FROM RESERVOIRS" is amended or repealed or until the Chair by Public Proclamation, declares that a Stage II Water Shortage ALERT is reinstated.  By order of Barry Jacobs, Chair of the Orange County Board of Commissioners, this the 14th day of October, 2002.


Household Hazardous Waste Collection to be held October 5

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

September 26, 2002

For more information: Orange Community Recycling, (919) 968-2788; recycling@co.orange.nc.us

The next Orange County household hazardous waste (HHW) collection will be on Saturday October 5, 2002 at the Orange County Landfill on Eubanks Road in Chapel Hill. The event is now open from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. to residents of Chatham, Durham, Orange and Wake Counties.  The HHW collections in Orange County have also been extended until the end of the year, occurring the first Saturday of each month through December. The expanded hours and dates will help accommodate the high demand for this special collection service, and encourage participation in the County’s Toxics Reduction Improvement Program, or TRIP, to keep harmful substances out of our landfill.  

Citizens can bring paints, pesticides, automotive fluids (such as antifreeze, diesel fuel, gasoline, and brake fluid), batteries, cleaning chemicals, fluorescent lights, fertilizers, solvents, and other hazardous materials from their households to the collection. Wastes should not be mixed together but kept in separate, non-leaking containers with the original label intact whenever possible.  No radioactive, medical, or business wastes are accepted.

If you have only a small amount of latex paint to dispose of and no other wastes, you don’t need to come to the Household Hazardous Waste collection to dispose of it.  You can safely dry the paint out at home.  Just be sure that the material is completely dry, as no liquid wastes are permitted in the landfill.  Once latex paint is thoroughly dried, residents can dispose of the cans, with the lids removed, in their regular trash. Accelerate the drying process by stirring kitty litter or sand into the open can of paint.  If the paint has been completely used up and there is only a thin residue of dried paint left in the container less that a ¼ inch coating in the bottom of the can), it can be recycled at drop-off sites and staffed convenience centers with other steel cans.  Make sure the can is made out of metal and the lid has been removed and discarded.

If you need paint for projects, free latex paint in good condition that has been diverted from the HHW collection is available at “The Paint Exchange”, open during the Household Hazardous Waste Collection.  Other unopened, reusable items such as spackle and stains that have been brought to the Household Hazardous Waste Collection are also offered for pick-up by residents.  All services provided at the Household Hazardous Waste Collection are free to residents.

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Lori N. Taft Appointed Recreation and Parks Management Director

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 

September 20, 2002

Contact:  John Link, County Manager, 245-2300

Orange County Manager John Link has appointed Lori N. Taft as Recreation and Parks Management Director.  Taft will begin work Monday, October 28, 2002.

Taft will plan, organize and direct a comprehensive recreation and parks management program for Orange County.  With approval of recent bond referenda, Orange County is significantly expanding its parks.  Once sites are acquired and concept plans developed, Taft will lead the development, management and maintenance of the new parks.

Taft has a Bachelor’s Degree in Physical Education from the University of Massachusetts and a Master’s of Education Degree in Physical Education and Recreation Administration from Temple University. 

Taft worked for over 17 years in the Recreation and Parks Department for New Castle County, Delaware.  She began work there as supervisor of sports and athletic activities for youth and progressed to District Recreation Supervisor. 

She left New Castle County to become Parks Administrator for the Wilmington State Parks for the State of Delaware.  While in that capacity, she managed the transition of these parks from New Castle County to State of Delaware management, and led a comprehensive assessment and planning process for these parks.  

Currently Taft lives in Oak Ridge, North Carolina where she has been actively involved as a volunteer serving on the Town’s Parks and Recreation Committee.

Link named an Assessment Panel to assist him in the selection process.  The Panel was made up of Orange County Commissioner Margaret Brown and Assistant County Manager Gwen Harvey. 

The search process included national recruitment.  It yielded 51 candidates.

Link said:  “We are very pleased that Lori is joining the Orange County team.  Her professional experience, enthusiasm and especially her vision for park development and management will be important to successfully completing our park plan.”

Commissioner Brown said:  “Parks are the wonderful ingredient in our quality of life.  Lori’s experience will be of great value to the citizens of Orange County in the development of our parks.”

Taft said:  “The leaders and citizens of Orange County have shown foresight and a commitment to maintaining high standards for quality of life in passing the two land conservation bond referenda. I look forward to the opportunity to work with this community in developing parks and planning recreation programs for everyone to enjoy.”

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Animal Control Reports 19th and 20th Cases of Rabies for 2002

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Date: 9-19-02

Contact information: John Sauls, Animal Control, 245-2081 ; jsauls@co.orange.nc.us

Media contact: Donna King dking@co.orange.nc.us

Animal Control reported today that two raccoons sent to the state public health lab during the past two weeks tested positive for rabies.

In the first case, which occurred on Walker Rd. northeast of Hillsborough, a young couple was disturbed by her dogs barking during the night They were unable to determine the cause until morning, when they found one of her two dogs barking at something in the garage. They discovered that there was a raccoon behind some lawn equipment and stored items in the garage and the dog could not get to it. They secured the dog in another area and the raccoon emerged out in to the driveway and then the yard where the young man shot it.

Although the young woman handled the dog when she picked it up to secure it, it was believed that neither of the dogs actually made contact with the raccoon. The dogs were up to date on their rabies vaccinations. The people were referred to a communicable disease nurse in the Health Department.

On Monday of this week, at 8:30 am, a woman who lives on Art Rd. near the Person County line saw a raccoon biting her dog in the stomach. The raccoon let go and she got the dog and put it in a bathroom in the house. She called Animal Control right away. The Animal Control Officer arrived to find the raccoon had died in her yard. In addition to the wound on the dog’s stomach or side there was also a wound on the dog’s mouth.

The dog had been a stray that the resident had taken in. She had taken the dog to the vet and had it vaccinated for rabies for the first time six days earlier. Unfortunately, six days is not enough time for the vaccine and the body’s immune system to begin producing rabies antibodies. The state public health veterinarian confirmed that we would have to treat the dog as if it had not been vaccinated. That means the dog would either have to be destroyed or confined alone for six months. Ultimately the owner chose not to confine the dog.

Animal Control Director John Sauls said, “Once again a dog has lost its life. A more timely rabies vaccination would have saved the dog.  It could be your dog next! The only way to protect your dog (or cat) is to be sure it has an up-to-date rabies vaccination.”

There are two upcoming reduced cost rabies clinics dates: the first is on Saturday, September 21st, from 9 am until 11 am at the Animal Shelter. The second date is Thursday, September 26th, from six ‘til seven pm at the two following locations: the courthouse parking lot on Margaret Lane in Hillsborough and the Caldwell Community Center on N.C. Highway 157 North. Cost is $5. per vaccination.

Animal Control and the Animal Protection Society continue to provide numerous cheap and convenient rabies vaccination clinics, Sauls said. However it is up to the pet owner to actually bring the pets to the clinics. “The price for failure to vaccinate is a $100.citation if Animal Control finds that you have failed to vaccinate even after we ordered you to do so. On the other hand the penalty for you dog can be death if the rabid raccoon finds him before we do.” 

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County Receives $784,000 Grant to Purchase Farmland Conservation Easements

September 17, 2002

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contacts:  David Stancil 245-2590, Rich Shaw 245-2591, Brent Bogue, 245-2750 (USDA/NRCS contact: Dick Fowler, 919-873-2104)

Orange County has received a grant of $784,155 in matching funds for the purchase of agricultural conservation easements, from the USDA Farmland Protection Program.

Signed into law this spring as part of the 2002 U.S. Farm Bill, the Farmland Protection Program was allotted $48 million nationwide to assist local governments and land trusts in the acquisition of agricultural conservation easements.

The program is administered by the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), a branch of USDA. North Carolina’s share is $2.2 million for the current fiscal year.

The County’s Environment and Resource Conservation Department, with assistance from the District Conservationist   and Soil and Water District staff, has been working with several farms on potential easement acquisitions. At the time proposals were requested for the USDA funds, three Orange County farms were ready to pursue the easements.

On June 27th, the Board of Commissioners approved the submittal of a grant application to the Farmland Protection Program. On July 15th, the County submitted a formal request for $788,900 in matching funds to acquire easements on the three farms. The grant award of $784,155 is 99.4% of the requested amount.

At this evening’s Board of Commissioners meeting, the Board will consider authorizing the cooperative agreement to receive the grant funds. Once signed, the County and farm owners will have until September 30, 2004 to complete the terms of the easements.

This is Orange County’s second grant for farmland easement acquisition. In January, 2001, the N.C. Farmland Preservation Trust Fund awarded a grant of  $107,000 for the purchase of an easement from Victor Walters on 71 acres of the Walters farm in Cedar Grove Township. That easement was completed and recorded in July of 2001.

The USDA/NRCS funds will be matched by funds from Orange County for the easement acquisition. County funds will come from monies dedicated to conservation easements in the approved capital budget for 2002-03, and future funds in the FY 2002-2012 Capital Investment Plan.

The three farms total 424 acres, two located in the northwestern portion of the County and one in the southwest. Additional details on the individual farms will be provided at a later time.

"We're thrilled to have federal support that stretches local tax dollars as we preserve our environment and make good on our commitment to help Orange County farmers protect their land,” noted Board of Commissioners Chair Barry Jacobs. “Farming is never easy. But in this time of depressed prices, dwindling tobacco markets, and drought, purchasing conservation easements is a way to assist farmers with their land stewardship while provided much-needed capital. The rest of us benefit by protecting important open space and by keeping farmers in business. We hope others in and beyond the agricultural community will join us in preserving the natural beauty of our county."

Conservation easements place voluntary restrictions on the future use of private property. Land that has a conservation easement remains in private ownership, but limits certain kinds of intensive development while protecting important conservation values, such as productive farmland and/or natural areas.   

The grant award is the sixth since March 2000 for the County’s Lands Legacy program, established by the Board of Commissioners in April 2000. The program, administered by the Environment and Resource Conservation Department, seeks to protect the County’s high-priority natural and cultural resources (including prime farmland) through voluntary means. Since March of 2000, Lands Legacy has secured $1.94 million in State and Federal grants to protect important resource lands.

The Farmland Protection Program allows USDA to enter into agreements with states, tribes, local governments and non-profit organizations such as land trusts to protect productive farmland. USDA provides up to 50% of the appraised fair market value of the conservation easement. The 2002 Farm Bill represents an investment in conservation on private lands, with a planned $13 billion nationally over the next six years. 

 

# # # 


Composting Demonstrations to be held
September 21

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Date: September 13, 2002

For more information: Orange Community Recycling, (919) 968-2788; recycling@co.orange.nc.us

Orange County Solid Waste Management, in cooperation with Chapel Hill Parks and Recreation, will be conducting two composting demonstrations on Saturday, September 21 at the Community Center on Estes Drive in Chapel Hill, 10:00 a.m.-11:30 a.m. and at 1:00 p.m.-2:30 p.m. 

The demonstrations will be held at the outdoor compost demonstration site located behind the rose garden at the Community Center, and are free.

These demonstrations will teach the basics of both outdoor composting methods and indoor composting with worms. 

For more information, please contact Muriel Williman, Education and Outreach Specialist, (919) 968-2788, or email recycling@co.orange.nc.us

 # # #


Mulch Available Starting September 30 with New Extended Hours

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Date: September 13, 2002

For more information: Orange Community Recycling, (919) 968-2788; recycling@co.orange.nc.us

Starting Monday, September 30, Orange County Solid Waste Management will once again have mulch made from yard waste available at the Orange County Landfill on Eubanks Road in Chapel Hill. Yard waste mulch can be purchased for $18.00 per 3 cubic yard scoop, Monday- Friday 8:00 a.m.- 4:00 p.m., and Saturday from 7:30 a.m.- 12:00 p.m. 

Compost is also available at the Orange County Landfill for $25.00/one cubic yard scoop.  The compost is made in part with food waste collected from Orange County businesses. Using these organic products will help suppress weeds and will improve water retention and fertility of garden and landscaping soils naturally.

Landfill staff will load trucks for mulch and compost purchasers.  Loads leaving the landfill must be tarped.

For more information please contact our office, (919) 932-2989, or email recycling@co.orange.nc.us

 # # #


Kick-off of Orange County Drought Response Program is Tomorrow, Friday, September 13

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

September 12, 2002

CONTACT:  Eric Griffin, Chair H2Orange, (919) 968-2449 ; egriffin@co.orange.nc.us

As water restrictions tighten, wells begin to dry up and the demand for water increases, local communities search for solutions to the five-year drought. 

The Orange County community is kicking off its response to the drought with a water donation from Wal-Mart to area relief agencies. On Friday, September 13, 2002 at 10:30 a.m. Inter-Faith Council, Orange Congregations in Mission, Orange County Social Services, and Barry Jacobs, Chair, Board of County Commissioners will be accepting a generous donation of water from Wal-Mart to kick off the “H2Orange” Drought Drive. This is one of many strategies of  “H2Orange”. 

Location: Orange County Emergency Management, 1914 New Hope Church Road, Chapel Hill, NC 27514.  968-2050. 

“H2Orange” is a work group comprised of local water suppliers, municipalities, government agencies, non-profits, and the agricultural community collaboratively working to empower citizens to conserve water and develop strategies for the months ahead. Their multi-faceted campaign addresses drought awareness, water conservation strategies, and encouraging consumer use of water saving devices. 

Current work group focus areas include:

¨      Drought Drive

¨      Drought Hotline

¨      Community outreach and education

¨      Water saving devices/leak test kits offered by water suppliers

¨      Agricultural Community Outreach

Various “H2Orange” representatives will be available to answer questions.

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Directions To Orange County Emergency Management
1914 New Hope Church Rd, Chapel Hill, NC 27514

From Interstate 40 - Take Exit 263 - New Hope Church Road exit; travel north on New Hope Church Road to the intersection with NC 86 South traffic light; go straight; then…(see below)

From Interstate 85 - Take Exit 165 - NC 86 South; travel south to the intersection with New Hope Church Road traffic light; turn left onto New Hope Church Road;

Then take fourth drive on the left into Emergency Management Facility.

If you need further information, our phone number is 919-968-2050.


Orange County Declares Stage III Water Restrictions in OWASA Service Area

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

September 9, 2002

For more information: Paul Thames, (919) 245-2300; pthames@co.orange.nc.us

Orange County Board of Commissioners Chair Barry Jacobs has declared a Stage III water shortage emergency in the unincorporated areas of the County served by the Orange Water and Sewer Authority (OWASA). 


SEPTEMBER 9, 2002

 PUBLIC PROCLAMATION OF A WATER SUPPLY EMERGENCY  IN THE UNINCORPORATED ORANGE COUNTY AREAS IN ACCORD WITH THE COUNTY’S WATER SHORTAGE ORDINANCE

            WHEREAS, the severe drought has caused the total water stored in University Lake and the Cane Creek Reservoir to decline to a level lower than in any previous September on record; and

            WHEREAS, long-range weather forecasts anticipate that current drought conditions will continue for several more months; and

            WHEREAS, on June 6, 2002, the County of Orange adopted “An Interim Ordinance Providing for the Year-Round Conservation of Water and for Temporary Restrictions During Water Shortages and Emergencies Related to all Orange Water and Sewer Authority Customers Located in the Unincorporated Part of Orange County,” which ordinance is referenced in this Public Proclamation as the “Water Shortage Ordinance”; and

            WHEREAS, on July 12, 2002, the County of Orange issued a “Proclamation of a Stage I Water Shortage Affecting Customers in the Unincorporated Orange County Areas Within the Orange Water and Sewer Authority’s Service Area”; and

            WHEREAS, on August 23, 2002, Orange County issued a “Public Proclamation of a Stage II Water Shortage in the Unincorporated Orange County Areas in Accord with the County’s Water Shortage Ordinance; and

            WHEREAS, the Executive Director of Orange Water and Sewer Authority has determined that additional water conservation measures are required and that a  water supply emergency exists; and

            WHEREAS, on September 5, 2002, Orange Water and Sewer Authority’s Board of Directors met in a Special Meeting and formally supported the Executive Director’s determination that a water supply emergency exists.

            NOW, THEREFORE, I, Barry Jacobs, Chairman of the Orange County Board of Commissioners, do hereby:

I. Proclaim the existence of a Water Supply Emergency under the Water Shortage Ordinance of the County of Orange.

II. Call upon all customers and users of OWASA water in the County of Orange to follow the Water Supply Emergency water use restrictions, as provided in the County’s ordinance.  These restrictions include the following:

 A.  No OWASA-supplied potable water shall be used for any outdoor purposes other than emergency fire suppression.

 B.  Water service may be discontinued or reduced, as determined by Orange Water and Sewer Authority’s Executive Director, in designated portions of the OWASA service area through the manipulation of valves, pumps, and other appurtenances in order to preserve the availability of water for public health and safety facilities, such as hospitals, medical clinics, etc., fire protection, and other critical community needs.

C. Customers who use Orange Water and Sewer Authority’s supplied potable drinking water for heating/cooling systems shall be encouraged to reduce the heating/cooling demand in all but the most essential facilities.

Violation of the Water Shortage Ordinance shall be a misdemeanor punishable as provided in North Carolina General Statute 14-4.  Violation of the Water Shortage Ordinance shall subject the offender to a civil penalty of $25 for the first offense, $50 for the second offense within a 30-day period, and $100 for any additional offense within a 30-day period.  If the penalty is not paid within 10 days of a citation, the County may recover the penalty through a civil action in the nature of a debt.  The County may enforce the Water Shortage Ordinance through any appropriate equitable action.  Each day that a violation continues shall constitute a separate offense.  The County may enforce the Water Shortage Ordinance through one or a combination of the above remedies.

Barry Jacobs, Chair of the Board of Commissioners

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The Place to be on Primary Election Night is www.co.orange.nc.us

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

September 5, 2002

For more information: Dick Taylor, Information Systems Director, 245-2276, dtaylor@co.orange.nc.us; Carolyn Thomas, Elections Director, 245-2351, cthomas@co.orange.nc.us

County residents need only go as far as their Internet connection for access to up-to-the-minute results of the September 10 primary election.

Orange County elections officials are once again using the World Wide Web to post elections results, which will be available in real time at County’s web site, www.co.orange.nc.us.

The vote tallies will be available to anyone with Internet access on election night simply by clicking a link on the County’s home page or “What’s New” page.

As the totals start rolling in Tuesday evening, election returns will be updated every five minutes as ballots from individual precincts are counted and the results entered into the computer system.

For those without internet access on election night, the Board of Elections will provide computer terminals and paper printouts of the election returns at its offices in the Court Street Annex, 110 E. King St., in Hillsborough.

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