Board of County Commissioners
200 South Cameron St.
P.O. Box 8181
Hillsborough,
North Carolina 27278
(919) 245-2130
Fax: (919) 644-0246


Contact: David Hunt
Information Specialist
(919) 245-2126
Fax: (919) 644-0246
e-mail:

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News Releases

September/October 2008

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Past News Releases

Elections 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Release Date: October 31, 2008

Contact: Tracy Reams, Director of Elections, Orange County  (919) 245-2350

No Changes in Orange County Early Voting

The Orange County Board of Elections voted unanimously not to extend the voting hours beyond 1:00 p.m. on Saturday, November 1, 2008. 

The Orange County Board of Elections met this morning in an emergency meeting as directed by the State Board of Elections to discuss the possible extension of early voting hours on Saturday.  The board members agreed unanimously not to make changes in the pre-established voting times. 

There are 5 sites available for early voting in Orange County on Saturday, November 1st, from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.

MOREHEAD PLANETARIUM,

   250 East Franklin Street, Chapel Hill

CARRBORO TOWN HALL,

   301 West Main Street, Carrboro

ORANGE COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY,

   300 West Tryon Street, Hillsborough

SEYMOUR SENIOR CENTER,

   2551 Homestead Road, Chapel Hill

NORTHERN HUMAN SERVICES CENTER,

   5800 NC Hwy 86 North, Hillsborough

For additional information on voting in Orange County, visit the Orange County Board of Elections website. 

http://www.co.orange.nc.us/elect/index.asp

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BOCC 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Release Date: October 30, 2008

Contact: Donna Baker, Clerk to the Board of Commissioners  (919) 245-2130

Orange County Board of Commissioners - Changes in the Regular Meeting Schedule

Pursuant to North Carolina General Statute 153A-40, the Board of County Commissioners provides notice of the following changes in the 2008 meeting schedule.   

The Orange County Board of Commissioners will hold a mini-retreat on Friday, November 14, 2008 starting at 9:00 a.m. at Camp Chestnut Ridge, 4300 Camp Chestnut Ridge Road, Efland. 

The Orange County Board of Commissioners will hold a Public Comment Session on the Siting of the Solid Waste Transfer Station on Monday, November 17, 2008 starting at 7:00 p.m. at McDougle Middle School, 900 Old Fayetteville Road, Chapel Hill. 

Also, as a matter of note, the October 28, 2008 Orange County Board of Commissioners’ Budget Work Session was adjourned to reconvene on Thursday, November 6, 2008 at 7:00 p.m. for a closed session prior to the Regular Meeting scheduled to start at 7:30 p.m. at the F. Gordon Battle Courtroom, 106 E. Margaret Lane, Hillsborough. 

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Social Services 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Release Date: October 24, 2008

Contact: LaKecia Robbins, Orange County Department of Social Services (919) 245-2818

Heating Assistance

ORANGE COUNTY- The Orange County Department of Social Services will be taking applications for the Low Income Energy Assistance Program November 3rd-14th at the Chapel Hill and Hillsborough locations. 

The Low Income Energy Assistance Program (LIEAP) gives families a one-time cash payment to help pay their heating bills.  Applications are taken for a limited time period during November of each year.  Eligible households receive a check in the mail in early February.  The funds received should be used for home heating costs. 

Eligibility for the program is based on income, family size, and amount of savings.  A qualifying family of four can have a monthly gross income of up to $1,944.00 and should have savings of less than $2,200.00.  To apply, residents should bring check stubs or verification of income received during October 2008 along with Social Security numbers for each person in the home listed on the application.  Recipients of the Federal Food and Nutrition Program, formerly Food Stamps, are automatically screened for eligibility.

In addition to the LIEAP Program, the agency also runs the county’s Emergency Assistance Program.  This program can help pay past due heating, cooling, and water bills to keep a resident’s utilities from being turned off.  It can also help with past due rent payments and necessary medications for the uninsured.

Nancy Coston, Director of the Orange County Department of Social Services, stated, “we are seeing more families struggle to make ends meet.  Heating and other utility costs will be high this winter and low-income families will struggle more than most.”

Applications for all Social Services programs are available at both Orange County Department of Social Services locations: 300 West Tryon Street in Hillsborough, and 2501 Homestead Road in Chapel Hill.

Anyone interested in making a monetary donation can bring it to either of the Department of Social Services locations or mail it to the agency at P.O. Box 8181, Hillsborough, NC 27278.  Please specify that donations are for the energy and crisis assistance programs.  All donations to the Orange County Department of Social Services are tax deductible.

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Social Services 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Release Date: October 14, 2008

Contact: Nancy Coston, Orange County Department of Social Services Director (919) 245-2802

Speaker Joe Hackney and Representative Verla Insko Recognized for Support of Foster and Adopted Children

ORANGE COUNTY- Leading child advocates will gather on October 17th at 1:00 p.m. at the Southern Human Services Center in Chapel Hill to honor Speaker Hackney and Representative Insko for their role in securing the largest increase in the foster and adoptive family reimbursement rate since the program began.  The General Assembly passed legislation in July that secures a 28% increase in the reimbursement rate.

“The current reimbursement rates make it financially difficult for many foster families to open their homes to a child,” said Karen McLeod, President/CEP of the Children and Family Services Association – N.C.  “Legislators stepped forward in their responsibility to ensure that the families making this type of commitment to North Carolina’s children were provided realistic financial support to help protect the health, well-being and futures of the children in their care.”

A national study, “Hitting the M.A.R.C.,” released in early 2008 examined the foster and adoptive reimbursement rates of every state in the nation and found that North Carolina needed a significant increase to provide for even the most basic needs of children in foster care. The study demonstrated that inadequate reimbursement rates negatively affect foster parent recruitment and retention. By establishing foster care rates that better cover actual costs, children will receive necessary care, resulting in happier, more normal childhoods.  Child welfare systems are more effective in maintaining a stable pool of foster parents, and children gain more opportunities to grow up in permanent families. The “Hitting the M.A.R.C.” study was a catalyst for the effort to secure an increase in the 2008 legislative session.

“We are incredibly fortunate to have legislators like Speaker Hackney and Representative Insko who recognize the critical role of foster families” said Nancy Coston, Director of Orange County Social Services.  “Their efforts to ensure that this increase occurred demonstrated their support for the children in our communities and for our goals of assuring that children can live in families with caring adults.”

The event is being sponsored by the Orange County Department of Social Services in partnership with the Children and Family Services Association of North Carolina. 

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Housing 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Release Date: October 9, 2008

Contact: Angela Thompson-Rockett, Board of County Commissioners' Office  (919) 245-2125

Volunteers Needed for Orange County Housing Authority

Orange County is currently seeking applicants for the Orange County Housing Authority (OCHA) Board.  The goal of the Orange County Housing Authority is to provide decent, safe, and sanitary housing for the low and moderate income families in the County. OCHA currently manages approximately 615 Section 8 Housing Choice Vouchers in the County and provides leadership for other affordable housing initiatives in the County. 

The Authority is governed by a seven (7) member Board, appointed by the Orange County Board of County Commissioners for staggered terms for periods of no more than five years each.  At least one member of the Board shall be a Section 8 voucher holder.  Other board members may represent the following areas of interest: real estate; development; affordable housing; real estate and/or municipal law; and banking.

For an application, or for more information on this volunteer opportunity or other Orange County Advisory Boards, please contact the office of the Clerk to the Board at (919) 245-2125 or email: athompson-rockett@co.orange.nc.us.  If you would like to complete an application online, or download one in Adobe.pdf format, please visit the County’s Website, http://www.co.orange.nc.us and click on the “Volunteer Boards” icon. 

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Solid Waste 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Release Date: October 7, 2008

Contact: Gwen Harvey, Assistant Orange County Manager  (919) 245-2307

Orange County Transfer Station Public Comment Process

The Orange County Board of Commissioners held a scheduled work session on September 16, 2008 on the topic of siting a Solid Waste Transfer Station. Included in the materials for that meeting were documents related to soliciting public comment as part of the ongoing siting process.  Neither the future steps in the process nor the “Community-Specific Criteria-Public Input Form” suggested by the consultant, Olver, Inc.,were approved by the Board. No deadline for submitting public comment was established by the Board either.

Olver, Inc.was instead directed by the Board to suspend the proposed public meetings and to report its independent professional findings under the Community-Specific criteria at the next Transfer Station siting meeting. County management and Olver, Inc. will provide a recommended strategy to the Board at the next Transfer Station siting meeting on how best to incorporate public comment into the overall siting process.

The next Transfer Station siting meeting will be held at the Southern Human Services Center on Homestead Road in Chapel Hill on Tuesday, October 21 starting at 5:30 PM.  Each Transfer Station siting meeting agenda includes a period reserved for public comment. The Board of Commissioners values public comment, has built opportunities for residents to speak into every step of the process, and will continue to do this in keeping with Orange County traditions of openness and participatory government.

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Social Services 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Release Date: October 6, 2008

Contact: Nancy Coston, Orange County Department of Social Services Director (919) 245-2802

Orange County Seeks Sponsors and Donors for Social Services' Holiday Programs

ORANGE COUNTY- The Orange County Department of Social Services is currently recruiting sponsors and donors for the annual county holiday programs.  The programs, sponsored by the Orange County Department of Social Services in partnership with Toys for Tots and Balloons and Tunes, provide new toys and clothing for low-income, at-risk Orange County children during the holidays.  The agency and its partners recruit donors and sponsors to provide toys, clothing and food to needy Orange County residents.  This year, these combined efforts will try to provide toys to over 5,000 Orange County children.

There are many in Orange County who are not fortunate enough to be able to provide gifts for their families during the holiday season.  These families rely on gifts and food donated through the Orange County Department of Social Services to make their holidays a joyous event.  Referrals for the program come from the school systems, non-profit organizations, and other county agencies.  “There are many families in our community that are struggling financially right now, and the extra burden of the holidays is just too much for them,” said Nancy Coston, Director of the Orange County Department of Social Services, adding “It can be really difficult for parents to explain why there are no gifts to give.”  

This year, the Orange County Department of Social Services is operating two holiday programs.  Share Your Holiday is a program, in partnership with Balloons and Tunes, that pairs families served by the agency with sponsors from the community.  Families submit wish-lists that often include coats, shoes, and other clothing items, as well as toys for the children.  Donors may choose to sponsor a family or give money that will be used to purchase items for families that do not get sponsored.

The Orange County Department of Social Services is also partnering with Toys for Tots to organize the second annual Orange County Toy Chest.  The Toy Chest is a holiday store in which eligible parents can select 2-3 new toys per child to supplement their holiday.  The Toy Chest is designed to serve families at 200% of poverty that are not being served by another DSS holiday program.

Making the holidays brighter for over 5,000 low-income children in Orange County will not be possible without the support of individuals and businesses in the community.  Anyone interested in donating new children’s toys to the Toy Chest or sponsoring a family through the Share Your Holiday program is encouraged to contact Serena McPherson at (919) 245-2800.

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BOCC 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Release Date: September 26, 2008

Contact: Donna Baker, Orange County Clerk to the Board  of Commissioners (919) 245-2130

BOCC Special Meeting Notice

The Board of County Commissioners will hold a special meeting on Wednesday, October 1, 2008 at 3:00 p.m. at the BOCC Office in the Southern Human Services Center, 2501 Homestead Road, in Chapel Hill, N.C.

At this meeting the Board will go into closed session to “consider the qualifications, competence, character, fitness [and] conditions of appointment, … of an individual public officer or employee....” NCGS 143-318.11(a)(6).

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Emergency Services 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Release Date: September 19, 2008

Contact: Kim Woodward, Orange County Emergency Medical Services Operation Manager (919) 245-6100

Carrboro Fire-Rescue Recognized for Medical Certification

Orange County Emergency Services recognized Carrboro Fire-Rescue today for the becoming the first fire department in Orange County with all firefighters certified at the Emergency Medical Technician Basic (EMT-B) level.  Previously firefighters were trained at the medical first responder level. 

Representatives from Orange County Emergency Services met with members of the Carrboro Fire-Rescue Department at the Carrboro station on Friday, September 19, 2008 to celebrate Carrboro Fire-Rescue’s medical certification achievement.  This initiative for expanded medical training started over a year ago.  

EMT-Bs must attend an accredited State of North Carolina training program encompassing a minimum of 150 hours of initial education and must complete 24 hours per year of continuing education once certified.    EMT-Bs are trained in CPR, traumatic injury treatment and basic airway techniques, as well as many other emergency medical procedures. 

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BOCC

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Release Date: September 18, 2008

Contact: Donna Baker, Clerk to the Orange County Board of Commissioners, (919) 245-2130

Continuation of Meeting Notice

The Orange County Board of Commissioners adjourned the September 16, 2008 regular meeting to reconvene in a work session on Monday, September 22, 2008 at 7:30 p.m. at the Southern Human Services Center, 2501 Homestead Road in Chapel Hill. 

The anticipated topics of discussion among the Commissioners include appointment of the Orange County representative to the OWASA Board of Directors, the proposed animal ordinance amendment on the tethering of dogs, employee pay and benefit update and the 2035 Long Range Transportation Plan.  These items will return for consideration at a subsequent, regular scheduled BOCC meeting, the specific date to be determined.  Written public comment is welcome between meetings. 

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HRR

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Release Date: September 15, 2008

Contact: Jennifer Galassi, Orange County Department of Human Rights and Relations, (919) 960-3876

2008 Orange County Women's Agenda Assembly

[Chapel Hill, NC] From fixing high gas prices to stimulating the sluggish economy, the Presidential candidates clearly have a lot to say. With 24 hour news cycles and constant media attention, it can be hard for the average person to get a word in edgewise.

This Election season, organizers of the 2008 Orange County Women’s Agenda Assembly are trying to do just that. On Thursday, October 2, from 6-9 p.m. local women will gather at the Southern Human Services Center on Homestead Rd. in Chapel Hill to discuss the issues that matter most to them and their families.

Sponsored by the Orange County Commission for Women and local community organizations, this year’s Women’s Agenda Assembly is entitled “Women, Power and Change: Making a Difference Beyond the Election.”

“There’s been a lot of talk about the role women will play in this Election,” Jenn Frye chair of the Orange County Commission for Women said, “but there’s a need for a much better understanding of the issues women care about and what their priorities are going forward.”

Since 1988, organizers have held Women’s Agenda Assemblies in counties across North Carolina every other fall. The 2008 Agenda Assemblies mark the 20th anniversary of these events. Although several states implemented Women’s Agenda Assemblies in the 1980’s, only North Carolina has successfully continued this women’s democratic process for the past two decades.

At each assembly across the state, women will hear from local experts on issues like health care, education, the economy and violence against women. Participants will be given the opportunity discuss the issues and prioritize them to lay the foundation for policies addressed by local and state leaders. Eighty-five people attended the 2006 Orange County Agenda Assembly and this year organizers hope to see many more.

Candidates for elected office and elected officials are invited to attend the October 2 event to listen to discussion and to hear the priorities addressed by voters. Community organizations are also invited to share information to be displayed at the event. “We want to set up a space in which women’s voices can be heard through a meaningful dialogue,” Frye said. “It’s also a great opportunity for people to get to know elected officials, local candidates and other women in their community.”

The 2008 Women’s Agenda Assembly, Women, Power, and Change: Making a Difference Beyond the Election will be held from 6:00-9:00 p.m. at the Southern Human Services Center at 2501 Homestead Road in Chapel Hill. Food will be served beginning at 6:00 p.m. Speakers start at 6:30 p.m. and include experts from across Orange County and the Triangle area.

Transportation is provided from Hillsborough. Registration is free. Pre-registration is suggested but not required. Community members interested in participating should contact Pam Reynolds at 919-960-3875 for more information or to request a registration form.

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Library

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Release Date: September 8, 2008

Contact: Brenda Stephens, Orange County Library, (919) 245-2525

The Big Read Kick-off on Saturday, September 13, 2008

The North Central Literacy Collaborative will kick off its three-county literacy event, The Big Read, with a celebration at the Rock of Ages Winery in Hurdle Mills on Saturday, Sept. 13, beginning at 1 p.m. The event will signal the official start of a six-week focus on the importance of reading, fueled by the reading of John Steinbeck’s American classic, “The Grapes of Wrath.”

The kick-off will feature a festival type atmosphere for the entire family, highlighted by Depression-era musical entertainment presented by the N.C. Central University Jazz Combo and Reverdy Ransom III. It also will include refreshments (No wine will be served.), an antique car and tractor show, and remarks by event partners and community leaders. The keynote address will be presented by Susan Shillinglaw Scholar-in-Residence at the Steinbeck Institute in Salinas, Calif. A former faculty member at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Wake Forest University, Shillinglaw is co-author of an interpretive commentary of the 1940 Academy Award-winning adaptation of “The Grapes of Wrath.”

The kick-off also will provide more information on the many activities and special events to be held in the three-county region, including book distributions, film screenings, book discussions, exhibits of Depression-era photos, and canned food drives as well as other age-appropriate activities centered on the book’s themes. For a complete list of Big Read activities, visit the local website at www.bigreadnc.org.  The kick-off and all Big Read events are free and open to the public.

Noting that “The Grapes of Wrath” portrays a significant event in our national history, Big Read project leader Lionell Parker noted that the difficulties caused by economic hardship in the novel are common in much of today’s rural South. “Like the Joads, many of North Carolina’s small and rural communities find themselves at a crossroads and are in the process of rebuilding society by creating a hopeful but unclear future,” Parker said.

The North Central Literacy Collaborative includes Piedmont Community College, and the PCC Learning Resources Centers (Caswell and Person), the Hyconeechee Regional Libraries (Caswell, Orange and Person public libraries), the Caswell, Orange, and Person public school systems, and Durham Technical Community College Orange County Campus. The collaborative is the recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts grant for The Big Read the project.

The Big Read is an initiative of the National Endowment for the Arts designed to restore reading to the center of American culture. The NEA presents The Big Read in partnership with the Institute of Museum and Library Services and in cooperation with Arts Midwest. Support for The Big Read is provided by W.K. Kellogg Foundation. For more information on these agencies, go to www.neabigread.org.

Rock of Ages Winery is located at 1890 Charlie Long Rd., Hurdle Mills, NC 27541. For directions, visit the winery’s website at  www.rockofageswinery.com or call (336) 364-7625.
 

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Emergency Services 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Release Date: September 6, 2008

Contact: David Hunt, Orange County Emergency Operations Center, Public Information Officer, (919) 245-6111

Orange County Shelter Closed

The American Red Cross emergency shelter at Smith Middle School in Chapel Hill was closed today, shortly after lunch, at 12:30.

No area residents took advantage of shelter services during the time it was opened.

Orange County Emergency Services continues to monitor the effects of Hanna. 

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Emergency Services 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Release Date: September 6, 2008

Contact: David Hunt, Orange County Emergency Operations Center, Public Information Officer, (919) 245-6111

Orange County Shelter Opened

Due to localized flooding in some areas of Chapel Hill an emergency shelter has been opened at Smith Middle School. 

Brookwood Apartments, Camelot Village and Ridgefield Apartments on South Estes Drive have experienced localized flooding.  Residents have been notified and were advised to evacuate by law enforcement. 

The American Red Cross has opened an emergency shelter at Smith Middle School, 9201 Seawell School Road, Chapel Hill. 

Flooding is localized and water levels are expected to drop during the day Saturday. 

If there are no evacuees by 9:00 a.m. the shelter will close. 

Orange County Emergency Services continues to monitor the effects of Hanna. 

For non-emergency information on shelters and services, call the Emergency Operations Center public information hotline at (919) 245-6111. 

In an emergency call 9-1-1. 

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Emergency Services 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Release Date: September 5, 2008

Contact: David Hunt, Orange County Information Specialist, (919) 245-2126

Orange County Prepares for Hanna

Orange County, led by Emergency Services, has been busy this week preparing for Hanna. 

Conference calls have been held with emergency partners including representatives from area municipalities, law enforcement, UNC hospitals, area fire departments, American Red Cross, school systems, Animal Services, Health Department, Solid Waste, Public Works, OWASA, Forestry, Parks, and others. 

Generators have been tested, shelters stand ready to open if needed, swift water rescue teams are ready, chain saws have been sharpened, volunteers representing multiple agencies stand ready, transit busses are available if evacuation is necessary, storm debris sites are ready and multiple other disaster preparation processes have been activated. 

As of 11:00 a.m. Friday, September 5, 2008, no shelters are scheduled to be opened at this time. 

If shelters are needed, the two primary shelters in Orange County are Smith Middle School, 9201 Seawell School Rd., Chapel Hill and C. W. Stanford Middle School, 308 Orange High School Rd., Hillsborough. 

In addition to normal 9-1-1 services, Emergency Services will also activate an Emergency Operations Center to coordinate storm related activities. 

Animal Services staff members are coordinating with Emergency Services and are prepared to shelter pets this weekend and throughout the hurricane season at the County’s Animal Shelter off of Martin Luther King Blvd. in Chapel Hill.   In the event that a Red Cross shelter is opened, Animal Control Officers will stand ready to take pets from that shelter site to the Animal Shelter (except for service animals that are allowed at the Red Cross Shelter).  Animal Shelter staff and select volunteers stand ready to care for animals until such time as they are re-united with their caregivers.  Also, Animal Services staff will coordinate as needed with the Red Cross and its partners in caring for animals from any individual households adversely affected by the prevailing weather.

The Red Cross is available to provide Family Emergency Support on a case by case basis. 

The Special Needs Registry, a database of individuals who may require assistance in the event of a disaster, has been put into action by the Department of Social Services and is available as a support tool for Emergency Services during times of crisis.  For more information on the Special Needs Registry see the following link, http://www.co.orange.nc.us/socsvcs/special_needs_registry.asp

Residents are encouraged to monitor local radio and television stations for storm and shelter information.  Websites for newspapers, TV and radio are updated regularly. 

For non-emergency information on shelters and services, call the Emergency Operations Center public information hotline at (919) 245-6111.  (After 7:00 p.m. tonight, Friday, September 5, 2008.)

In an emergency call 9-1-1. 

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Emergency Services 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Release Date: September 3, 2008

Contact: Clint Osborn, Orange County Emergency Services, (919) 968-2050

Pre-Planning Saves Lives, Be Prepared

Damage reports from Gustav are still being collected.  In a 24 hour period, the projected path for the eye of Hurricane Hanna ranged from central North Carolina to the Outer Banks.  Ike and Josephine are stacked up in the Atlantic like jets looking for a place to land. 

As hazardous weather conditions approach, we need to be prepared. A key survival tool for all households is a 72-hour kit. During natural disasters, emergency responders may not be able to assist as quickly as they do under normal conditions due to hazardous travel conditions and/or increased call volume. We must be ready to take care of our families and ourselves.

“Now is the best time to make sure that you have at least a three-day supply of essential items as well as crucial information ready for immediate use or transportation if needed,” said Colonel Frank Montes de Oca, Director of Orange County Emergency Services.

To be prepared, consider storing the following items in your home. Some of the same items should also be stored in your vehicle.

RECOMMENDED 72-HOUR EMERGENCY KIT

Prepare a minimum three-day supply of essential items for each person and any pets in your home. Store your kit in a convenient place known to all family members. The kit should be in containers or bags (such as backpacks) that are durable, waterproof and portable for possible evacuation or relocation to an emergency shelter if necessary.

  • Battery-operated radio/TV
  • Flashlights and extra batteries
  • Drinking water (1 gallon per person per day), stored in clean plastic containers with tight-fitting screw-cap lids, and other beverages
  • Canned food, manual can opener, and cooking fuel such as sterno
  • Medications and prescriptions and contact information for family physicians
  • Special food and supplies for infants, elderly people, diabetics, etc.
  • First-aid kit and first-aid manual
  • Fire extinguisher
  • Bedding supplies, sanitary supplies (toilet paper, feminine supplies)
  • Cards, books, small games, road maps
  • Clothing, rain gear, sturdy shoes, extra glasses or contacts
  • Credit cards and cash, extra set of car keys, insurance policy numbers
  • Picture ID
  • List of important family information, style and serial numbers of medical devices, such as pacemakers
  • Food, water, medications, toys and carriers for all household pets

Monitor local media outlets for critical news and advisories. Additional preparation and disaster information can be found on the Orange County Emergency Services Web site: http://www.readyorange.org or

http://www.co.orange.nc.us/ems/documents/All-Hazards-Guide-2006.pdf

The American Red Cross, local power companies and state and federal emergency agencies provide preparedness and survival information.  Check their websites for additional information. 

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